To fetch and carry
fetch fetch, v. i. To bring one's self; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward. --Totten. [1913 Webster]

{To fetch away} (Naut.), to break loose; to roll or slide to leeward.

{To fetch and carry}, to serve obsequiously, like a trained spaniel. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fetch and carry — To perform humble services for another person • • • Main Entry: ↑fetch * * * fetch and carry phrase to do small simple jobs for someone such as bringing them things that they want Sid was helping in the kitchen, fetching and carrying. Thesaurus:… …   Useful english dictionary

  • fetch and carry — ► fetch and carry run backwards and forwards bringing things to someone in a servile way. Main Entry: ↑fetch …   English terms dictionary

  • fetch and carry (for somebody) — fetch and ˈcarry (for sb) idiom to do a lot of little jobs for sb as if you were their servant • Most of her day was spent fetching and carrying for her family. Main entry: ↑fetchidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • fetch and carry — to do small simple jobs for someone such as bringing them things that they want Sid was helping in the kitchen, fetching and carrying …   English dictionary

  • fetch and carry — idi to perform menial tasks …   From formal English to slang

  • To fetch away — fetch fetch, v. i. To bring one s self; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward. Totten. [1913 Webster] {To fetch away} (Naut.), to break loose; to roll or slide to leeward. {To fetch and carry}, to serve obsequiously,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fetch — fetch, v. i. To bring one s self; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward. Totten. [1913 Webster] {To fetch away} (Naut.), to break loose; to roll or slide to leeward. {To fetch and carry}, to serve obsequiously, like a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To carry on — Carry Car ry, v. i. 1. To act as a bearer; to convey anything; as, to fetch and carry. [1913 Webster] 2. To have propulsive power; to propel; as, a gun or mortar carries well. [1913 Webster] 3. To hold the head; said of a horse; as, to carry well …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Carry — Car ry, v. i. 1. To act as a bearer; to convey anything; as, to fetch and carry. [1913 Webster] 2. To have propulsive power; to propel; as, a gun or mortar carries well. [1913 Webster] 3. To hold the head; said of a horse; as, to carry well i. e …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fetch — fetch1 S2 [fetʃ] v [T] [: Old English; Origin: fetian, feccan] 1.) especially BrE to go and get something or someone and bring them back ▪ Quick! Go and fetch a doctor. ▪ Shannon went upstairs to fetch some blankets. fetch sb/sth from sth ▪ Would …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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