To drop off
Drop Drop, v. i. 1. To fall in drops. [1913 Webster]

The kindly dew drops from the higher tree, And wets the little plants that lowly dwell. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

2. To fall, in general, literally or figuratively; as, ripe fruit drops from a tree; wise words drop from the lips. [1913 Webster]

Mutilations of which the meaning has dropped out of memory. --H. Spencer. [1913 Webster]

When the sound of dropping nuts is heard. --Bryant. [1913 Webster]

3. To let drops fall; to discharge itself in drops. [1913 Webster]

The heavens . . . dropped at the presence of God. --Ps. lxviii. 8. [1913 Webster]

4. To fall dead, or to fall in death; as, dropping like flies. [1913 Webster]

Nothing, says Seneca, so soon reconciles us to the thoughts of our own death, as the prospect of one friend after another dropping round us. --Digby. [1913 Webster]

5. To come to an end; to cease; to pass out of mind; as, the affair dropped. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

6. To come unexpectedly; -- with in or into; as, my old friend dropped in a moment. --Steele. [1913 Webster]

Takes care to drop in when he thinks you are just seated. --Spectator. [1913 Webster]

7. To fall or be depressed; to lower; as, the point of the spear dropped a little. [1913 Webster]

8. To fall short of a mark. [R.] [1913 Webster]

Often it drops or overshoots by the disproportion of distance. --Collier. [1913 Webster]

9. To be deep in extent; to descend perpendicularly; as, her main topsail drops seventeen yards. [1913 Webster]

{To drop astern} (Naut.), to go astern of another vessel; to be left behind; to slacken the speed of a vessel so as to fall behind and to let another pass a head.

{To drop down} (Naut.), to sail, row, or move down a river, or toward the sea.

{To drop off}, to fall asleep gently; also, to die. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To fall off — Fall Fall (f[add]l), v. i. [imp. {Fell} (f[e^]l); p. p. {Fallen} (f[add]l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Falling}.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cast off — Cast Cast (k[.a]st), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cast}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Casting}.] [Cf. Dan. kaste, Icel. & Sw. kasta; perh. akin to L. {gerere} to bear, carry. E. jest.] 1. To send or drive by force; to throw; to fling; to hurl; to impel. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To draw off — draw draw (dr[add]), v. t. [imp. {Drew} (dr[udd]); p. p. {Drawn} (dr[add]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Drawing}.] [OE. dra[yogh]en, drahen, draien, drawen, AS. dragan; akin to Icel. & Sw. draga, Dan. drage to draw, carry, and prob. to OS. dragan to bear,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To let off — Let Let, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Let} ({Letted} (l[e^]t t[e^]d), [Obs].); p. pr. & vb. n. {Letting}.] [OE. leten, l[ae]ten (past tense lat, let, p. p. laten, leten, lete), AS. l[=ae]tan (past tense l[=e]t, p. p. l[=ae]ten); akin to OFries. l[=e]ta,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To drop astern — Drop Drop, v. i. 1. To fall in drops. [1913 Webster] The kindly dew drops from the higher tree, And wets the little plants that lowly dwell. Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. To fall, in general, literally or figuratively; as, ripe fruit drops from a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To drop down — Drop Drop, v. i. 1. To fall in drops. [1913 Webster] The kindly dew drops from the higher tree, And wets the little plants that lowly dwell. Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. To fall, in general, literally or figuratively; as, ripe fruit drops from a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • drop off — v. 1) (D; tr.) ( to leave ) to drop off at (could you drop off the books at the library?) 2) (misc.) to drop off to sleep * * * [ drɒp ɒf] (misc.) to drop off to sleep (D; tr.) ( to leave ) to drop off at (could you drop off the books at the… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • drop off the radar — verb To vanish or fall into obscurity. Not long after that, the band seemed to drop off the radar entirely, leading many to assume that they had broken up …   Wiktionary

  • drop-off — ˈdrop off noun [countable] 1. if there is a drop off in the amount, level, or number of something, it goes down or becomes less: • There has been a drop off in tourism this year. • temporary drop offs in sales 2. TRANSPORT a delivery, or the… …   Financial and business terms

  • drop off — {v.} 1. To take (someone or something) part of the way you are going. * /Joe asked Mrs. Jones to drop him off at the library on her way downtown./ 2. To go to sleep. * /Jimmy was thinking of his birthday party as he dropped off to sleep./ 3. To… …   Dictionary of American idioms

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