To drag an anchor
Drag Drag, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dragged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dragging}.] [OE. draggen; akin to Sw. dragga to search with a grapnel, fr. dragg grapnel, fr. draga to draw, the same word as E. draw. ? See {Draw}.] 1. To draw slowly or heavily onward; to pull along the ground by main force; to haul; to trail; -- applied to drawing heavy or resisting bodies or those inapt for drawing, with labor, along the ground or other surface; as, to drag stone or timber; to drag a net in fishing. [1913 Webster]

Dragged by the cords which through his feet were thrust. --Denham. [1913 Webster]

The grossness of his nature will have weight to drag thee down. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

A needless Alexandrine ends the song That, like a wounded snake, drags its slow length along. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. To break, as land, by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow; to draw a drag along the bottom of, as a stream or other water; hence, to search, as by means of a drag. [1913 Webster]

Then while I dragged my brains for such a song. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

3. To draw along, as something burdensome; hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty. [1913 Webster]

Have dragged a lingering life. -- Dryden. [1913 Webster]

{To drag an anchor} (Naut.), to trail it along the bottom when the anchor will not hold the ship.

Syn: See {Draw}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Shoe of an anchor — Shoe Shoe (sh[=oo]), n.; pl. {Shoes} (sh[=oo]z), formerly {Shoon} (sh[=oo]n), now provincial. [OE. sho, scho, AS. sc[=o]h, sce[ o]h; akin to OFries. sk[=o], OS. sk[=o]h, D. schoe, schoen, G. schuh, OHG. scuoh, Icel. sk[=o]r, Dan. & Sw. sko, Goth …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Drag — Drag, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dragged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dragging}.] [OE. draggen; akin to Sw. dragga to search with a grapnel, fr. dragg grapnel, fr. draga to draw, the same word as E. draw. ? See {Draw}.] 1. To draw slowly or heavily onward; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Anchor — For other uses, see Anchor (disambiguation). Ploudalmézeau, anchor of Amoco Cadiz An anchor is a device, normally made of metal, that is used to connect a vessel to the bed of a body of water to prevent the vessel from drifting due to wind or… …   Wikipedia

  • anchor — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. berth, slip, buoy, grapnel, kedge; mainstay, safeguard; anchorman, woman, or person. v. cast anchor, moor; fix, attach, fasten; hold fast. See navigation, stability, communication, connection. II… …   English dictionary for students

  • Anchor escapement — Anchor escapement. The anchor and escape wheel of a late 19th century clock …   Wikipedia

  • drag — /drag/, v., dragged, dragging, n., adj. v.t. 1. to draw with force, effort, or difficulty; pull heavily or slowly along; haul; trail: They dragged the carpet out of the house. 2. to search with a drag, grapnel, or the like: They dragged the lake… …   Universalium

  • anchor — [aŋ′kər] n. [ME anker < OE ancor < L anc(h)ora < Gr ankyra, an anchor, hook < IE base * ank , to bend > ANKLE] 1. a heavy object, usually a shaped iron weight with flukes, lowered by cable or chain to the bottom of a body of water… …   English World dictionary

  • Drag — Drag, v. i. 1. To be drawn along, as a rope or dress, on the ground; to trail; to be moved onward along the ground, or along the bottom of the sea, as an anchor that does not hold. [1913 Webster] 2. To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • anchor — anchorable, adj. anchorless, adj. anchorlike, adj. /ang keuhr/, n. 1. any of various devices dropped by a chain, cable, or rope to the bottom of a body of water for preventing or restricting the motion of a vessel or other floating object,… …   Universalium

  • drag — 1 verb dragged, dragging 1 PULL ALONG THE GROUND (T) to pull someone or something along the ground, often because they are too heavy to carry: drag sth away/along/through etc: Inge managed to drag the table into the kitchen. | Angry protesters… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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