To do stead
Stead Stead (st[e^]d), n. [OE. stede place, AS. stede; akin to LG. & D. stede, OS. stad, stedi, OHG. stat, G. statt, st["a]tte, Icel. sta[eth]r, Dan. sted, Sw. stad, Goth. sta[thorn]s, and E. stand. [root]163. See {Stand}, and cf. {Staith}, {Stithy}.] 1. Place, or spot, in general. [Obs., except in composition.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Fly, therefore, fly this fearful stead anon. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

2. Place or room which another had, has, or might have. ``Stewards of your steads.'' --Piers Plowman. [1913 Webster]

In stead of bounds, he a pillar set. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

3. A frame on which a bed is laid; a bedstead. [R.] [1913 Webster]

The genial bed, Sallow the feet, the borders, and the stead. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. A farmhouse and offices. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.] [1913 Webster]

Note: The word is now commonly used as the last part of a compound; as, farmstead, homestead, roadstead, etc. [1913 Webster]

{In stead of}, in place of. See {Instead}.

{To stand in stead}, or {To do stead}, to be of use or great advantage. [1913 Webster]

The smallest act . . . shall stand us in great stead. --Atterbury. [1913 Webster]

Here thy sword can do thee little stead. --Milton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To stand in stead — Stead Stead (st[e^]d), n. [OE. stede place, AS. stede; akin to LG. & D. stede, OS. stad, stedi, OHG. stat, G. statt, st[ a]tte, Icel. sta[eth]r, Dan. sted, Sw. stad, Goth. sta[thorn]s, and E. stand. [root]163. See {Stand}, and cf. {Staith},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stead — (st[e^]d), n. [OE. stede place, AS. stede; akin to LG. & D. stede, OS. stad, stedi, OHG. stat, G. statt, st[ a]tte, Icel. sta[eth]r, Dan. sted, Sw. stad, Goth. sta[thorn]s, and E. stand. [root]163. See {Stand}, and cf. {Staith}, {Stithy}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • stead — [sted] n [: Old English; Origin: stede place ] 1.) do sth in sb s stead formal to do something that someone else usually does or was going to do ▪ Pearson was appointed to go in Harrison s stead. 2.) stand/serve/hold sb in good stead to be very… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • do something in someone's stead — do something in someone’s stead formal phrase to do something that someone else usually does or was going to do She offered to go in his stead. Thesaurus: to replace, or to be replacedsynonym Main entry: stead …   Useful english dictionary

  • stead — [ sted ] noun do something in someone s stead FORMAL to do something that someone else usually does or was going to do stand/put/hold someone in good stead to be useful or helpful to someone …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • stead — noun do sth in sb s stead formal to do something that someone else usually does or was going to do see also: stand sb in good stead stand 1 (43) …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • do something in someone's stead — formal to do something that someone else usually does or was going to do She offered to go in his stead …   English dictionary

  • stead|y-state — steady state, Physics. the condition in which all or most changes or disturbances have been eliminated from a system: »We see examples of the steady state in the equilibrium phase of chemical reactions…and in the “balance of nature” (Emilio Q.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • stead — [[t]ste̱d[/t]] 1) PHRASE: PHR after v If you do something in someone s stead, you replace them and do it instead of them. [FORMAL] We hope you will consent to act in his stead... My grandmother and aunt will be there in my parents stead. 2)… …   English dictionary

  • stead — UK [sted] / US noun stand/put/hold someone in good stead to be useful or helpful to someone It s a useful experience which will stand you in good stead later in life. do something in someone s stead …   English dictionary

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