To dip snuff
Dip Dip, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dipped}or {Dipt} (?); p. pr. & vb. n. {Dipping}.] [OE. dippen, duppen, AS. dyppan; akin to Dan. dyppe, Sw. doppa, and to AS. d?pan to baptize, OS. d?pian, D. doopen, G. taufen, Sw. d["o]pa, Goth. daupjan, Lith. dubus deep, hollow, OSlav. dupl? hollow, and to E. dive. Cf. {Deep}, {Dive}.] 1. To plunge or immerse; especially, to put for a moment into a liquid; to insert into a fluid and withdraw again. [1913 Webster]

The priest shall dip his finger in the blood. --Lev. iv. 6. [1913 Webster]

[Wat'ry fowl] now dip their pinions in the briny deep. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

While the prime swallow dips his wing. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

2. To immerse for baptism; to baptize by immersion. --Book of Common Prayer. Fuller. [1913 Webster]

3. To wet, as if by immersing; to moisten. [Poetic] [1913 Webster]

A cold shuddering dew Dips me all o'er. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

4. To plunge or engage thoroughly in any affair. [1913 Webster]

He was . . . dipt in the rebellion of the Commons. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

5. To take out, by dipping a dipper, ladle, or other receptacle, into a fluid and removing a part; -- often with out; as, to dip water from a boiler; to dip out water. [1913 Webster]

6. To engage as a pledge; to mortgage. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Live on the use and never dip thy lands. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

{Dipped candle}, a candle made by repeatedly dipping a wick in melted tallow.

{To dip snuff}, to take snuff by rubbing it on the gums and teeth. [Southern U. S.]

{To dip the colors} (Naut.), to lower the colors and return them to place; -- a form of naval salute. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To dip the colors — Dip Dip, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dipped}or {Dipt} (?); p. pr. & vb. n. {Dipping}.] [OE. dippen, duppen, AS. dyppan; akin to Dan. dyppe, Sw. doppa, and to AS. d?pan to baptize, OS. d?pian, D. doopen, G. taufen, Sw. d[ o]pa, Goth. daupjan, Lith. dubus …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dip snuff — To practise snuff dipping (qv under ↑snuff1) • • • Main Entry: ↑dip …   Useful english dictionary

  • Dip — Dip, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dipped}or {Dipt} (?); p. pr. & vb. n. {Dipping}.] [OE. dippen, duppen, AS. dyppan; akin to Dan. dyppe, Sw. doppa, and to AS. d?pan to baptize, OS. d?pian, D. doopen, G. taufen, Sw. d[ o]pa, Goth. daupjan, Lith. dubus… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dip — Dip, v. i. 1. To immerse one s self; to become plunged in a liquid; to sink. [1913 Webster] The sun s rim dips; the stars rush out. Coleridge. [1913 Webster] 2. To perform the action of plunging some receptacle, as a dipper, ladle. etc.; into a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dip — [dip] vt. dipped or occas.Now Rare dipt, dipping [ME dippen < OE dyppan, to immerse < Gmc * dup , to be deep: see DIMPLE] 1. to put into or under liquid for a moment and then quickly take out; immerse 2. to dye in this way 3. to clean… …   English World dictionary

  • dip — 1. (dip) (2404↑, 636↓) to leave abruptly. To get the hell out of somewhere. When I saw the Vanilla Ice cd in my date s cd player, I knew I had to dip. Author: Laura Claire http://dip.urbanup.com/697887 2. (dip) (1918↑, 571↓) Dip is a form of… …   Urban English dictionary

  • Snuff — For other uses, see Snuff (disambiguation). Snuff is a product made from ground or pulverised tobacco leaves. It is an example of smokeless tobacco. It originated in the Americas and was in common use in Europe by the 17th century. In recent… …   Wikipedia

  • dip — dip1 dippable, adj., n. /dip/, v., dipped or (Archaic) dipt; dipping; n. v.t. 1. to plunge (something, as a cloth or sponge) temporarily into a liquid, so as to moisten it, dye it, or cause it to take up some of the liquid: He dipped the brush… …   Universalium

  • DIP — may refer to: Contents 1 As a three letter acronym 1.1 In science and technology 1.1.1 In computer scie …   Wikipedia

  • dip — I. verb (dipped; dipping) Etymology: Middle English dippen, from Old English dyppan; akin to Old High German tupfen to wash, Lithuanian dubus deep Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. to plunge or immerse momentarily or partially under …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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