To dig in
Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. -- Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to E. 1st dag. [root]67.] 1. To turn up, or delve in, (earth) with a spade or a hoe; to open, loosen, or break up (the soil) with a spade, or other sharp instrument; to pierce, open, or loosen, as if with a spade. [1913 Webster]

Be first to dig the ground. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To get by digging; as, to dig potatoes, or gold. [1913 Webster]

3. To hollow out, as a well; to form, as a ditch, by removing earth; to excavate; as, to dig a ditch or a well. [1913 Webster]

4. To thrust; to poke. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

You should have seen children . . . dig and push their mothers under the sides, saying thus to them: Look, mother, how great a lubber doth yet wear pearls. --Robynson (More's Utopia). [1913 Webster]

5. To like; enjoy; admire. The whole class digs Pearl Jam. [Colloq.] [PJC]

{To dig down}, to undermine and cause to fall by digging; as, to dig down a wall.

{To dig from}, {To dig out of}, {To dig out}, {To dig up}, to get out or obtain by digging; as, to dig coal from or out of a mine; to dig out fossils; to dig up a tree. The preposition is often omitted; as, the men are digging coal, digging iron ore, digging potatoes.

{To dig in}, (a) to cover by digging; as, to dig in manure. (b) To entrench oneself so as to give stronger resistance; -- used of warfare or negotiating situations.

{to dig in one's heels} To offer stubborn resistance. [1913 Webster +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • to dig in one's heels — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To dig down — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To dig from — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To dig out — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To dig out of — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To dig up — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dig in — {v.}, {informal} 1. To dig ditches for protection against an enemy attack. * /The soldiers dug in and waited for the enemy to come./ 2a. To go seriously to work; work hard. * /John dug in and finished his homework very quickly./ 2b. To begin… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • dig in — {v.}, {informal} 1. To dig ditches for protection against an enemy attack. * /The soldiers dug in and waited for the enemy to come./ 2a. To go seriously to work; work hard. * /John dug in and finished his homework very quickly./ 2b. To begin… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Dig In — Single by Lenny Kravitz from the album Lenny Released November 13, 20 …   Wikipedia

  • To dig out — Dig Dig, v. i. 1. To work with a spade or other like implement; to do servile work; to delve. [1913 Webster] Dig for it more than for hid treasures. Job iii. 21. [1913 Webster] I can not dig; to beg I am ashamed. Luke xvi. 3. [1913 Webster] 2.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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