To dangle about
Dangle Dan"gle (d[a^][ng]"g'l), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Dangled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dangling}.] [Akin to Dan. dangle, dial. Sw. dangla, Dan. dingle, Sw. dingla, Icel. dingla; perh. from E. ding.] To hang loosely, or with a swinging or jerking motion. [1913 Webster]

He'd rather on a gibbet dangle Than miss his dear delight, to wrangle. --Hudibras. [1913 Webster]

From her lifted hand Dangled a length of ribbon. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

{To dangle about} or {To dangle after}, to hang upon importunately; to court the favor of; to beset. [1913 Webster]

The Presbyterians, and other fanatics that dangle after them, are well inclined to pull down the present establishment. --Swift. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To dangle after — Dangle Dan gle (d[a^][ng] g l), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Dangled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dangling}.] [Akin to Dan. dangle, dial. Sw. dangla, Dan. dingle, Sw. dingla, Icel. dingla; perh. from E. ding.] To hang loosely, or with a swinging or jerking motion …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dangle — Dan gle (d[a^][ng] g l), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Dangled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dangling}.] [Akin to Dan. dangle, dial. Sw. dangla, Dan. dingle, Sw. dingla, Icel. dingla; perh. from E. ding.] To hang loosely, or with a swinging or jerking motion. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dangle — 1590s, probably from Scandinavian (Cf. Dan. dangle, Swed. dangla to swing about, Norw. dangla), perhaps via N.Fris. dangeln. Related: Dangled; dangling …   Etymology dictionary

  • dangle — [c]/ˈdæŋgəl / (say dangguhl) verb (dangled, dangling) –verb (i) 1. to hang loosely with a swaying motion. 2. Colloquial to be hanged. 3. to hang about or follow a person, as if seeking favour. –verb (t) 4. to cause to dangle; hold or carry… …   Australian English dictionary

  • To hang around — Hang Hang, v. i. 1. To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without support from below; to dangle; to float; to rest; to remain; to stay. [1913 Webster] 2. To be fastened in such a manner as to allow of free motion on the point or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hang back — Hang Hang, v. i. 1. To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without support from below; to dangle; to float; to rest; to remain; to stay. [1913 Webster] 2. To be fastened in such a manner as to allow of free motion on the point or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hang by the eyelids — Hang Hang, v. i. 1. To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without support from below; to dangle; to float; to rest; to remain; to stay. [1913 Webster] 2. To be fastened in such a manner as to allow of free motion on the point or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hang in doubt — Hang Hang, v. i. 1. To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without support from below; to dangle; to float; to rest; to remain; to stay. [1913 Webster] 2. To be fastened in such a manner as to allow of free motion on the point or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hang on — Hang Hang, v. i. 1. To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without support from below; to dangle; to float; to rest; to remain; to stay. [1913 Webster] 2. To be fastened in such a manner as to allow of free motion on the point or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hang on the lips — Hang Hang, v. i. 1. To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without support from below; to dangle; to float; to rest; to remain; to stay. [1913 Webster] 2. To be fastened in such a manner as to allow of free motion on the point or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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