To cut and run
Cut Cut (k[u^]t), v. i. 1. To do the work of an edged tool; to serve in dividing or gashing; as, a knife cuts well. [1913 Webster]

2. To admit of incision or severance; to yield to a cutting instrument. [1913 Webster]

Panels of white wood that cuts like cheese. --Holmes. [1913 Webster]

3. To perform the operation of dividing, severing, incising, intersecting, etc.; to use a cutting instrument. [1913 Webster]

He saved the lives of thousands by his manner of cutting for the stone. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

4. To make a stroke with a whip. [1913 Webster]

5. To interfere, as a horse. [1913 Webster]

6. To move or make off quickly. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

7. To divide a pack of cards into two portion to decide the deal or trump, or to change the order of the cards to be dealt. [1913 Webster]

{To cut across}, to pass over or through in the most direct way; as, to cut across a field.

{To cut and run}, to make off suddenly and quickly; -- from the cutting of a ship's cable, when there is not time to raise the anchor. [Colloq.]

{To cut in} or {To cut into}, to interrupt; to join in anything suddenly.

{To cut up}. (a) To play pranks. [Colloq.] (b) To divide into portions well or ill; to have the property left at one's death turn out well or poorly when divided among heirs, legatees, etc. [Slang.] ``When I die, may I cut up as well as Morgan Pendennis.'' --Thackeray. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cut and run — {v.}, {informal} To abandon an unfavorable situation. * /When the price of coffee dropped sharply many investors wanted to cut and run./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • cut and run — {v.}, {informal} To abandon an unfavorable situation. * /When the price of coffee dropped sharply many investors wanted to cut and run./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Cut and run (disambiguation) — Cut and run is a pejorative phrase used in the context of a war or battle to mean cowardly retreat. Cut and run may also refer to: Cut and Run (game), a board game Cut and Run (record label), a breakbeat record label This disambiguation page… …   Wikipedia

  • Cut and run — For other uses, see Cut and run (disambiguation). Cut and run is a pejorative[citation needed] phrase used in the context of a war or battle meaning cowardly retreat.[citation needed] Thus, stripped of emotional connotation, the phrase simply… …   Wikipedia

  • Cut and Run (game) — For other uses, see Cut and run (disambiguation). Cut and Run is a board game for 3 to 6 players, produced by Cut and Run Productions Ltd. The main aim of the game is to travel round the circular board, using dice. The space you land on usually… …   Wikipedia

  • cut and run — verb a) To sail away quickly by cutting the yarns that hold the sails furled. They held on as long as they could, but when the heavy artillery fire started, they had to cut and run. b) To hurry away; to escape. President Bush laid out the… …   Wiktionary

  • To cut across — Cut Cut (k[u^]t), v. i. 1. To do the work of an edged tool; to serve in dividing or gashing; as, a knife cuts well. [1913 Webster] 2. To admit of incision or severance; to yield to a cutting instrument. [1913 Webster] Panels of white wood that… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cut in — Cut Cut (k[u^]t), v. i. 1. To do the work of an edged tool; to serve in dividing or gashing; as, a knife cuts well. [1913 Webster] 2. To admit of incision or severance; to yield to a cutting instrument. [1913 Webster] Panels of white wood that… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cut into — Cut Cut (k[u^]t), v. i. 1. To do the work of an edged tool; to serve in dividing or gashing; as, a knife cuts well. [1913 Webster] 2. To admit of incision or severance; to yield to a cutting instrument. [1913 Webster] Panels of white wood that… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cut up — Cut Cut (k[u^]t), v. i. 1. To do the work of an edged tool; to serve in dividing or gashing; as, a knife cuts well. [1913 Webster] 2. To admit of incision or severance; to yield to a cutting instrument. [1913 Webster] Panels of white wood that… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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