To cost dear
Cost Cost (k[o^]st; 115), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cost}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Costing}.] [OF. coster, couster, F. co[^u]ter, fr. L. constare to stand at, to cost; con- + stare to stand. See {Stand}, and cf. {Constant}.] 1. To require to be given, expended, or laid out therefor, as in barter, purchase, acquisition, etc.; to cause the cost, expenditure, relinquishment, or loss of; as, the ticket cost a dollar; the effort cost his life. [1913 Webster]

A diamond gone, cost me two thousand ducats. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Though it cost me ten nights' watchings. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To require to be borne or suffered; to cause. [1913 Webster]

To do him wanton rites, which cost them woe. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{To cost dear}, to require or occasion a large outlay of money, or much labor, self-denial, suffering, etc. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • You Can Leave, but It's Going to Cost You — Song infobox Name = You Can Leave, But It s Going to Cost You Caption = Here, My Dear cover Artist = Marvin Gaye Album = Here, My Dear Released = 1978 track no = 12 Recorded = 1977 Genre = Funk/soul Length = 5:30 Writer = Marvin Gaye Label =… …   Wikipedia

  • Cost — (k[o^]st; 115), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cost}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Costing}.] [OF. coster, couster, F. co[^u]ter, fr. L. constare to stand at, to cost; con + stare to stand. See {Stand}, and cf. {Constant}.] 1. To require to be given, expended, or laid …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cost — (k[o^]st; 115), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cost}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Costing}.] [OF. coster, couster, F. co[^u]ter, fr. L. constare to stand at, to cost; con + stare to stand. See {Stand}, and cf. {Constant}.] 1. To require to be given, expended, or laid …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cost — cost1 W1S1 [kɔst US ko:st] n 1.) the amount of money that you have to pay in order to buy, do, or produce something cost of ▪ the cost of accommodation ▪ I offered to pay the cost of the taxi. ▪ Insurance to cover the cost of a funeral is… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • cost — [[t]kɒ̱st, AM kɔ͟ːst[/t]] ♦ costs, costing (The form cost is used in the present tense, and is also the past tense and participle, except for meaning 4, where the form costed is used.) 1) N COUNT: usu sing, oft N of n The cost of something is the …   English dictionary

  • dear — dear1 [ dır ] adjective *** ▸ 1 at beginning of letter ▸ 2 loved/liked very much ▸ 3 expensive ▸ 4 used for speaking to someone ▸ 5 nice ▸ + PHRASES 1. ) Dear used in front of someone s name at the beginning of a letter to them: Dear Diana, I… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • dear — I UK [dɪə(r)] / US [dɪr] adjective Word forms dear : adjective dear comparative dearer superlative dearest *** 1) Dear used in front of someone s name at the beginning of a letter to them Dear Diana, I hope you re feeling better now. 2) loved or… …   English dictionary

  • cost someone dear — ● cost * * * cost someone dear british phrase to cause a lot of problems for someone, or to make them lose a lot of money This is a mistake that could cost the company dear. Thesaurus: to cause problems for someone or somethingsynonym Main entry …   Useful english dictionary

  • cost sb dear — ► to cause someone to have a lot problems or to lose a lot of money: »The Government s lack of knowledge about IT systems has undoubtedly cost it dear. Main Entry: ↑dear …   Financial and business terms

  • dear — [dɪə ǁ dɪr] adjective 1. especially BrE costing a lot of money; = EXPENSIVE: • I could never afford a house around here they re far too dear. 2. FINANCE BANKING if mo …   Financial and business terms

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