To come to the front
Front Front (fr[u^]nt), n. [F. frant forehead, L. frons, frontis; perh. akin to E. brow.] 1. The forehead or brow, the part of the face above the eyes; sometimes, also, the whole face. [1913 Webster]

Bless'd with his father's front, his mother's tongue. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Grim-visaged war hath smoothed his wrinkled front. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

His front yet threatens, and his frowns command. --Prior. [1913 Webster]

2. The forehead, countenance, or personal presence, as expressive of character or temper, and especially, of boldness of disposition, sometimes of impudence; seeming; as, a bold front; a hardened front; hence, an attitude and demeanor intended to represent one's feelings, even if not actually felt; as, to put on a good front. [1913 Webster +PJC]

With smiling fronts encountering. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The inhabitants showed a bold front. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

3. The part or surface of anything which seems to look out, or to be directed forward; the fore or forward part; the foremost rank; the van; -- the opposite to back or rear; as, the front of a house; the front of an army. [1913 Webster]

Had he his hurts before? Ay, on the front. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. A position directly before the face of a person, or before the foremost part of a thing; as, in front of un person, of the troops, or of a house. [1913 Webster]

5. The most conspicuous part. [1913 Webster]

The very head and front of my offending. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. That which covers the foremost part of the head: a front piece of false hair worn by women. [1913 Webster]

Like any plain Miss Smith's, who wears s front. --Mrs. Browning. [1913 Webster]

7. The beginning. ``Summer's front.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

8. (Fort.) All the works along one side of the polygon inclosing the site which is fortified. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

9. (Phon.) The middle of the upper part of the tongue, -- the part of the tongue which is more or less raised toward the palate in the pronunciation of certain sounds, as the vowel i in machine, e in bed, and consonant y in you. See Guide to Pronunciation, [sect]10. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

10. The call boy whose turn it is to answer the call, which is often the word ``front,'' used as an exclamation. [Hotel Cant] [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Bastioned front} (Mil.), a curtain connerting two half bastions.

{Front door}, the door in the front wall of a building, usually the principal entrance.

{Front of fortification}, the works constructed upon any one side of a polygon. --Farrow.

{Front of operations}, all that part of the field of operations in front of the successive positions occupied by the army as it moves forward. --Farrow.

{To come to the front}, to attain prominence or leadership. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To come or draw to a head — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To give one the head — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • to go over the head of a person — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come it over — Over O ver, adv. 1. From one side to another; from side to side; across; crosswise; as, a board, or a tree, a foot over, i. e., a foot in diameter. [1913 Webster] 2. From one person or place to another regarded as on the opposite side of a space… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To draw to a head — Draw Draw, v. i. 1. To pull; to exert strength in drawing anything; to have force to move anything by pulling; as, a horse draws well; the sails of a ship draw well. [1913 Webster] Note: A sail is said to draw when it is filled with wind. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To look to — Look Look (l[oo^]k), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Looked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Looking}.] [OE. loken, AS. l[=o]cian; akin to G. lugen, OHG. luog[=e]n.] 1. To direct the eyes for the purpose of seeing something; to direct the eyes toward an object; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come into play — Play Play, n. 1. Amusement; sport; frolic; gambols. [1913 Webster] 2. Any exercise, or series of actions, intended for amusement or diversion; a game. [1913 Webster] John naturally loved rough play. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 3. The act or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cast in the teeth — Tooth Tooth (t[=oo]th), n.; pl. {Teeth} (t[=e]th). [OE. toth,tooth, AS. t[=o][eth]; akin to OFries. t[=o]th, OS. & D. tand, OHG. zang, zan, G. zahn, Icel. t[ o]nn, Sw. & Dan. tand, Goth. tumpus, Lith. dantis, W. dant, L. dens, dentis, Gr. odoy s …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bring up the rear — Rear Rear, a. Being behind, or in the hindmost part; hindmost; as, the rear rank of a company. [1913 Webster] {Rear admiral}, an officer in the navy, next in rank below a vice admiral and above a commodore. See {Admiral}. {Rear front} (Mil.), the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To — (?, emphatic or alone, ?, obscure or unemphatic), prep. [AS. t[=o]; akin to OS. & OFries. t[=o], D. toe, G. zu, OHG. zuo, zua, z[=o], Russ. do, Ir. & Gael. do, OL. do, du, as in endo, indu, in, Gr. ?, as in ? homeward. [root]200. Cf. {Too},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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