To come in at the hawse holes
Hawse Hawse (h[add]z or h[add]s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, h[=a]ls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See {Collar}, and cf. {Halse} to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. --Harris. [1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) (a) The situation of the cables when a vessel is moored with two anchors, one on the starboard, the other on the port bow. (b) The distance ahead to which the cables usually extend; as, the ship has a clear or open hawse, or a foul hawse; to anchor in our hawse, or athwart hawse. (c) That part of a vessel's bow in which are the hawse holes for the cables. [1913 Webster]

{Athwart hawse}. See under {Athwart}.

{Foul hawse}, a hawse in which the cables cross each other, or are twisted together.

{Hawse block}, a block used to stop up a hawse hole at sea; -- called also {hawse plug}.

{Hawse piece}, one of the foremost timbers of a ship, through which the hawse hole is cut.

{Hawse plug}. Same as {Hawse block} (above).

{To come in at the hawse holes}, to enter the naval service at the lowest grade. [Cant]

{To freshen the hawse}, to veer out a little more cable and bring the chafe and strain on another part. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To freshen the hawse — Hawse Hawse (h[add]z or h[add]s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, h[=a]ls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See {Collar}, and cf. {Halse} to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. Harris. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hawse — (h[add]z or h[add]s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, h[=a]ls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See {Collar}, and cf. {Halse} to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. Harris. [1913 Webster] 2.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hawse block — Hawse Hawse (h[add]z or h[add]s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, h[=a]ls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See {Collar}, and cf. {Halse} to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. Harris. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hawse piece — Hawse Hawse (h[add]z or h[add]s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, h[=a]ls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See {Collar}, and cf. {Halse} to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. Harris. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hawse plug — Hawse Hawse (h[add]z or h[add]s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, h[=a]ls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See {Collar}, and cf. {Halse} to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. Harris. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hawse plug — Hawse Hawse (h[add]z or h[add]s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, h[=a]ls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See {Collar}, and cf. {Halse} to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. Harris. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The Boats of the "Glen Carrig" — Infobox Book | name = The Boats of Glen Carrig title orig = translator = image caption = dust jacket of The Boats of Glen Carrig author = William Hope Hodgson illustrator = cover artist = country = United Kingdom language = English series = genre …   Wikipedia

  • Athwart hawse — Hawse Hawse (h[add]z or h[add]s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, h[=a]ls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See {Collar}, and cf. {Halse} to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. Harris. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Foul hawse — Hawse Hawse (h[add]z or h[add]s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, h[=a]ls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See {Collar}, and cf. {Halse} to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. Harris. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Glossary of nautical terms — This is a glossary of nautical terms; some remain current, many date from the 17th 19th century. See also Wiktionary s nautical terms, Category:Nautical terms, and Nautical metaphors in English. Contents: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R …   Wikipedia

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