To come in
In In, adv. 1. Not out; within; inside. In, the preposition, becomes an adverb by omission of its object, leaving it as the representative of an adverbial phrase, the context indicating what the omitted object is; as, he takes in the situation (i. e., he comprehends it in his mind); the Republicans were in (i. e., in office); in at one ear and out at the other (i. e., in or into the head); his side was in (i. e., in the turn at the bat); he came in (i. e., into the house). [1913 Webster]

Their vacation . . . falls in so pat with ours. --Lamb. [1913 Webster]

Note: The sails of a vessel are said, in nautical language, to be in when they are furled, or when stowed. In certain cases in has an adjectival sense; as, the in train (i. e., the incoming train); compare up grade, down grade, undertow, afterthought, etc. [1913 Webster]

2. (Law) With privilege or possession; -- used to denote a holding, possession, or seisin; as, in by descent; in by purchase; in of the seisin of her husband. --Burrill. [1913 Webster]

{In and in breeding}. See under {Breeding}.

{In and out} (Naut.), through and through; -- said of a through bolt in a ship's side. --Knight.

{To be in}, to be at home; as, Mrs. A. is in.

{To come in}. See under {Come}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To come in — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come in for — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come in at the hawse holes — Hawse Hawse (h[add]z or h[add]s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, h[=a]ls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See {Collar}, and cf. {Halse} to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. Harris. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • know enough to come in out of the rain — {v. phr.} To have good sense; know how to take care of yourself. Usually used in the negative. * /Bob does so many foolish things that his mother says he doesn t know enough to come in out of the rain./ * /Sally may look stupid, but she knows… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • know enough to come in out of the rain — {v. phr.} To have good sense; know how to take care of yourself. Usually used in the negative. * /Bob does so many foolish things that his mother says he doesn t know enough to come in out of the rain./ * /Sally may look stupid, but she knows… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To be in — In In, adv. 1. Not out; within; inside. In, the preposition, becomes an adverb by omission of its object, leaving it as the representative of an adverbial phrase, the context indicating what the omitted object is; as, he takes in the situation (i …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To call in — Call Call (k[add]l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Called} (k[add]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Calling}] [OE. callen, AS. ceallian; akin to Icel. & Sw. kalla, Dan. kalde, D. kallen to talk, prate, OHG. kall[=o]n to call; cf. Gr. ghry ein to speak, sing, Skr. gar …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To run in — Run Run, v. i. [imp. {Ran}or {Run}; p. p. {Run}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Running}.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To strike in — Strike Strike, v. i. To move; to advance; to proceed; to take a course; as, to strike into the fields. [1913 Webster] A mouse . . . struck forth sternly [bodily]. Piers Plowman. [1913 Webster] 2. To deliver a quick blow or thrust; to give blows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall in — Fall Fall (f[add]l), v. i. [imp. {Fell} (f[e^]l); p. p. {Fallen} (f[add]l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Falling}.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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