To clear out
Clear Clear (kl[=e]r), v. i. 1. To become free from clouds or fog; to become fair; -- of the weather; -- often followed by up, off, or away. [1913 Webster]

So foul a sky clears not without a storm. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Advise him to stay till the weather clears up. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

2. To become free from turbidity; -- of solutions or suspensions of liquids; as, the salt has not completely dissolved until the suspension clears up; when refrigerated, the juice may become cloudy, but when warmed to room temperature, it clears up again. [PJC]

3. To disengage one's self from incumbrances, distress, or entanglements; to become free. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

He that clears at once will relapse; for finding himself out of straits, he will revert to his customs; but he that cleareth by degrees induceth a habit of frugality. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

3. (Banking) To make exchanges of checks and bills, and settle balances, as is done in a clearing house. [1913 Webster]

4. To obtain a clearance; as, the steamer cleared for Liverpool to-day. [1913 Webster]

{To clear out}, to go or run away; to depart. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To make out — make make, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {made} (m[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {making}.] [OE. maken, makien, AS. macian; akin to OS. mak?n, OFries. makia, D. maken, G. machen, OHG. mahh?n to join, fit, prepare, make, Dan. mage. Cf. {Match} an equal.] 1. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take out — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To draw out — draw draw (dr[add]), v. t. [imp. {Drew} (dr[udd]); p. p. {Drawn} (dr[add]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Drawing}.] [OE. dra[yogh]en, drahen, draien, drawen, AS. dragan; akin to Icel. & Sw. draga, Dan. drage to draw, carry, and prob. to OS. dragan to bear,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bring out — Bring Bring, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Brought}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bringing}.] [OE. bringen, AS. bringan; akin to OS. brengian, D. brengen, Fries. brenga, OHG. bringan, G. bringen, Goth. briggan.] 1. To convey to the place where the speaker is or is to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To work out — Work Work (w[^u]rk), v. t. 1. To labor or operate upon; to give exertion and effort to; to prepare for use, or to utilize, by labor. [1913 Webster] He could have told them of two or three gold mines, and a silver mine, and given the reason why… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bear out — Bear Bear (b[^a]r), v. t. [imp. {Bore} (b[=o]r) (formerly {Bare} (b[^a]r)); p. p. {Born} (b[^o]rn), {Borne} (b[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Bearing}.] [OE. beren, AS. beran, beoran, to bear, carry, produce; akin to D. baren to bring forth, G. geb[… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To blow out — Blow Blow, v. t. 1. To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means; as, to blow the fire. [1913 Webster] 2. To drive by a current air; to impel; as, the tempest blew the ship ashore. [1913 Webster] Off at sea northeast winds… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To call out — Call Call (k[add]l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Called} (k[add]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Calling}] [OE. callen, AS. ceallian; akin to Icel. & Sw. kalla, Dan. kalde, D. kallen to talk, prate, OHG. kall[=o]n to call; cf. Gr. ghry ein to speak, sing, Skr. gar …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • clear out — {v.} 1. To take everything out of; empty. * /When Bill was moved to another class he cleared out his desk./ 2. {informal} To leave suddenly; go away; depart. * /The cop told the boys to clear out./ * /Bob cleared out without paying his room… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • clear out — {v.} 1. To take everything out of; empty. * /When Bill was moved to another class he cleared out his desk./ 2. {informal} To leave suddenly; go away; depart. * /The cop told the boys to clear out./ * /Bob cleared out without paying his room… …   Dictionary of American idioms

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”