To claw away
Claw Claw (kl[add]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Clawed} (kl[add]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Clawing}.] [AS. clawan. See {Claw}, n.] 1. To pull, tear, or scratch with, or as with, claws or nails. [1913 Webster]

2. To relieve from some uneasy sensation, as by scratching; to tickle; hence, to flatter; to court. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Rich men they claw, soothe up, and flatter; the poor they contemn and despise. --Holland. [1913 Webster]

3. To rail at; to scold. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

In the aforesaid preamble, the king fairly claweth the great monasteries, wherein, saith he, religion, thanks be to God, is right well kept and observed; though he claweth them soon after in another acceptation. --T. Fuller [1913 Webster]

{Claw me, claw thee}, stand by me and I will stand by you; -- an old proverb. --Tyndale.

{To claw away}, to scold or revile. ``The jade Fortune is to be clawed away for it, if you should lose it.'' --L'Estrange.

{To claw (one) on the back}, to tickle; to express approbation. (Obs.) --Chaucer.

{To claw (one) on the gall}, to find fault with; to vex. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To claw one on the back — Claw Claw (kl[add]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Clawed} (kl[add]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Clawing}.] [AS. clawan. See {Claw}, n.] 1. To pull, tear, or scratch with, or as with, claws or nails. [1913 Webster] 2. To relieve from some uneasy sensation, as by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To claw one on the gall — Claw Claw (kl[add]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Clawed} (kl[add]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Clawing}.] [AS. clawan. See {Claw}, n.] 1. To pull, tear, or scratch with, or as with, claws or nails. [1913 Webster] 2. To relieve from some uneasy sensation, as by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Claw me claw thee — Claw Claw (kl[add]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Clawed} (kl[add]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Clawing}.] [AS. clawan. See {Claw}, n.] 1. To pull, tear, or scratch with, or as with, claws or nails. [1913 Webster] 2. To relieve from some uneasy sensation, as by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Claw — (kl[add]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Clawed} (kl[add]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Clawing}.] [AS. clawan. See {Claw}, n.] 1. To pull, tear, or scratch with, or as with, claws or nails. [1913 Webster] 2. To relieve from some uneasy sensation, as by scratching; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Claw the Unconquered — Claw Red Sonja/Claw the Unconquered: Devil s Hands #1. Art by Alex Ross. Publication information Publisher …   Wikipedia

  • claw — ► NOUN 1) a curved, pointed horny nail on each digit of the foot in birds, lizards, and some mammals. 2) the pincer of a crab, scorpion, or other arthropod. ► VERB 1) scratch or tear at with the claws or fingernails. 2) (claw away) try… …   English terms dictionary

  • Claw-free graph — A claw In graph theory, an area of mathematics, a claw free graph is a graph that does not have a claw as an induced subgraph. A claw is another name for the complete bipartite graph K1,3 (that is, a star graph with three edges, three leaves, and …   Wikipedia

  • claw — /klɔ / (say klaw) noun 1. a sharp, usually curved, nail on the foot of an animal. 2. the foot of an animal armed with such nails. 3. any part or thing resembling a claw, as the cleft end of the head of a hammer. 4. the pincers of some shellfish… …   Australian English dictionary

  • claw off — intransitive verb of a boat : to beat to windward to prevent going aground on a lee shore * * * claw off (nautical) (of sailing vessels) to move away from (a hazard) by beating • • • Main Entry: ↑claw …   Useful english dictionary

  • To give to the dogs — Dog Dog (d[o^]g), n. [AS. docga; akin to D. dog mastiff, Dan. dogge, Sw. dogg.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) A quadruped of the genus {Canis}, esp. the domestic dog ({Canis familiaris}). Note: The dog is distinguished above all others of the inferior animals… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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