To change one's tune
Change Change (ch[=a]nj), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Changed} (ch[=a]njd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Changing}.] [F. changer, fr. LL. cambiare, to exchange, barter, L. cambire. Cf. {Cambial}.] 1. To alter; to make different; to cause to pass from one state to another; as, to change the position, character, or appearance of a thing; to change the countenance. [1913 Webster]

Therefore will I change their glory into shame. --Hosea. iv. 7. [1913 Webster]

2. To alter by substituting something else for, or by giving up for something else; as, to change the clothes; to change one's occupation; to change one's intention. [1913 Webster]

They that do change old love for new, Pray gods, they change for worse! --Peele. [1913 Webster]

3. To give and take reciprocally; to exchange; -- followed by with; as, to change place, or hats, or money, with another. [1913 Webster]

Look upon those thousands with whom thou wouldst not, for any interest, change thy fortune and condition. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

4. Specifically: To give, or receive, smaller denominations of money (technically called change) for; as, to change a gold coin or a bank bill. [1913 Webster]

He pulled out a thirty-pound note and bid me change it. --Goldsmith. [1913 Webster]

{To change a horse, or To change hand} (Man.), to turn or bear the horse's head from one hand to the other, from the left to right, or from the right to the left.

{To change hands}, to change owners.

{To change one's tune}, to become less confident or boastful. [Colloq.]

{To change step}, to take a break in the regular succession of steps, in marching or walking, as by bringing the hollow of one foot against the heel of the other, and then stepping off with the foot which is in advance.

Syn: To alter; vary; deviate; substitute; innovate; diversify; shift; veer; turn. See {Alter}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • change one's tune — CHANGE ONE S MIND, do a U turn, have a change of heart; Brit. do an about turn. → tune * * * change one s tune 1. To change one s attitudes or opinions 2. To change one s manner of speaking • • • Main Entry: ↑change change one s tune or sing… …   Useful english dictionary

  • change one's tune — idi change one s tune, to reverse one s opinions; change one s mind …   From formal English to slang

  • change one's tune — our Bachelor Bob seems to have changed his tune about settling down and raising a family Syn: change one s mind, do a U turn, have a change of heart; do an about face; informal do a one eighty, pull a U ey …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • change one's tune — make a change in one s story,statement or opinions He has begun to change his tune recently and is beginning to agree that we need to do things a little differently …   Idioms and examples

  • change one's tune — verb a) To reconsider; rethink; to reach a different conclusion. I think theyll change their tune as soon as they try it the other way. b) To change ones story. The suspect changed his tune when he learned the police had the evidence …   Wiktionary

  • change one's tune —  Alter one s behaviour or attitude (usu. to a more humble one) …   A concise dictionary of English slang

  • change one's tune — {v. phr.}, {informal} To make a change in your story, statement, or claim; change your way of acting. * /The man said he was innocent, but when they found the stolen money in his pocket he changed his tune./ * /Bob was rude to his teacher, but… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • change one's tune — {v. phr.}, {informal} To make a change in your story, statement, or claim; change your way of acting. * /The man said he was innocent, but when they found the stolen money in his pocket he changed his tune./ * /Bob was rude to his teacher, but… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • change\ one's\ tune — v. phr. informal To make a change in your story, statement, or claim; change your way of acting. The man said he was innocent, but when they found the stolen money in his pocket he changed his tune. Bob was rude to his teacher, but she threatened …   Словарь американских идиом

  • To carry one's point — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”