To catch up with
Catch Catch, v. i. 1. To attain possession. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Have is have, however men do catch. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To be held or impeded by entanglement or a light obstruction; as, a kite catches in a tree; a door catches so as not to open. [1913 Webster]

3. To take hold; as, the bolt does not catch. [1913 Webster]

4. To spread by, or as by, infecting; to communicate. [1913 Webster]

Does the sedition catch from man to man? --Addison. [1913 Webster]

{To catch at}, to attempt to seize; to be eager to get or use. ``[To] catch at all opportunities of subverting the state.'' --Addison.

{To catch up with}, to come up with; to overtake. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To catch up — Catch Catch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Caught}or {Catched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Catching}. Catched is rarely used.] [OE. cacchen, OF. cachier, dialectic form of chacier to hunt, F. chasser, fr. (assumend) LL. captiare, for L. capture, V. intens. of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take order with — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To catch at — Catch Catch, v. i. 1. To attain possession. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Have is have, however men do catch. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To be held or impeded by entanglement or a light obstruction; as, a kite catches in a tree; a door catches so as not to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • catch up — {v.} 1. To take or pick up suddenly; grab (something). * /She caught up the book from the table and ran out of the room./ 2. To capture or trap (someone) in a situation; concern or interest very much. Usually used in the passive with in . * /The… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • catch up — {v.} 1. To take or pick up suddenly; grab (something). * /She caught up the book from the table and ran out of the room./ 2. To capture or trap (someone) in a situation; concern or interest very much. Usually used in the passive with in . * /The… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To catch fire — Catch Catch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Caught}or {Catched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Catching}. Catched is rarely used.] [OE. cacchen, OF. cachier, dialectic form of chacier to hunt, F. chasser, fr. (assumend) LL. captiare, for L. capture, V. intens. of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • to catch it — Catch Catch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Caught}or {Catched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Catching}. Catched is rarely used.] [OE. cacchen, OF. cachier, dialectic form of chacier to hunt, F. chasser, fr. (assumend) LL. captiare, for L. capture, V. intens. of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To catch one's eye — Catch Catch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Caught}or {Catched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Catching}. Catched is rarely used.] [OE. cacchen, OF. cachier, dialectic form of chacier to hunt, F. chasser, fr. (assumend) LL. captiare, for L. capture, V. intens. of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Catch-up effect — The catch up effect, also called the theory of convergence, states that poorer economies tend to grow at faster rates than richer economies. Therefore, all economies should in the long run converge in terms of per capita income and productivity.… …   Wikipedia

  • catch-up — I. adjective Date: 1945 intended to catch up to a theoretical norm or a competitor s accomplishments II. noun Date: 1948 the act or fact of catching up or trying to catch up (as with a norm or competitor) < had to play catch up >; also an… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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