To buy on credit


To buy on credit
Buy Buy (b[imac]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bought} (b[add]t); p. pr. & vb. n. {Buying} (b[imac]"[i^]ng).] [OE. buggen, buggen, bien, AS. bycgan, akin to OS. buggean, Goth. bugjan.] 1. To acquire the ownership of (property) by giving an accepted price or consideration therefor, or by agreeing to do so; to acquire by the payment of a price or value; to purchase; -- opposed to sell. [1913 Webster]

Buy what thou hast no need of, and ere long thou wilt sell thy necessaries. --B. Franklin. [1913 Webster]

2. To acquire or procure by something given or done in exchange, literally or figuratively; to get, at a cost or sacrifice; to buy pleasure with pain. [1913 Webster]

Buy the truth and sell it not; also wisdom, and instruction, and understanding. --Prov. xxiii. 23. [1913 Webster]

{To buy again}. See {Againbuy}. [Obs.] --Chaucer.

{To buy off}. (a) To influence to compliance; to cause to bend or yield by some consideration; as, to buy off conscience. (b) To detach by a consideration given; as, to buy off one from a party.

{To buy out} (a) To buy off, or detach from. --Shak. (b) To purchase the share or shares of in a stock, fund, or partnership, by which the seller is separated from the company, and the purchaser takes his place; as, A buys out B. (c) To purchase the entire stock in trade and the good will of a business.

{To buy in}, to purchase stock in any fund or partnership.

{To buy on credit}, to purchase, on a promise, in fact or in law, to make payment at a future day.

{To buy the refusal} (of anything), to give a consideration for the right of purchasing, at a fixed price, at a future time. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Buy — (b[imac]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bought} (b[add]t); p. pr. & vb. n. {Buying} (b[imac] [i^]ng).] [OE. buggen, buggen, bien, AS. bycgan, akin to OS. buggean, Goth. bugjan.] 1. To acquire the ownership of (property) by giving an accepted price or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Credit card — Personal finance Credit and debt Pawnbroker Student loan Employment contract Salary Wage Empl …   Wikipedia

  • credit — [[t]kre̱dɪt[/t]] ♦♦ credits, crediting, credited 1) N UNCOUNT: oft on N If you are allowed credit, you are allowed to pay for goods or services several weeks or months after you have received them. The group can t get credit to buy farming… …   English dictionary

  • buy — Synonyms and related words: abide by, accede, accept, accept for gospel, accept implicitly, acclaim, acquiesce, acquiesce in, acquire, advantageous purchase, agree, agree to, agree with, applaud, approach, assent, bargain, be certain, believe,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • buy in — Synonyms and related words: buy, buy back, buy into, buy off, buy on credit, buy up, complete a purchase, corner, engross, financier, invest, invest in, lay out money, make a buy, make an investment, monopolize, place, plow back into, plunge,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • buy off — Synonyms and related words: approach, bribe, buy, buy back, buy in, buy into, buy on credit, buy up, complete a purchase, corner, corrupt, engross, fix, get at, get to, grease, grease the palm, have, lubricate, make a buy, monopolize, pay off,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • credit —   Hō ai ē; hua, heluna (as for a university course).    ♦ Buy on credit, kū ai hō ai ē. Ask for credit, hō ai ē.    ♦ Give him credit for working hard, e ho omaika i iāia no kona hō ikaika ana …   English-Hawaiian dictionary

  • Buy More — (Burbank) Industry Retail Founder(s) Moses Finkelstein Headquarters Burbank, CA …   Wikipedia

  • credit — [n1] recognition; trust acclaim, acknowledgment, approval, attention, belief, Brownie points*, commendation, confidence, credence, distinction, faith, fame, glory, honor, kudos*, merit, notice, pat on the back*, points*, praise, reliance,… …   New thesaurus

  • Credit rationing — refers to the situation where lenders limit the supply of additional credit to borrowers who demand funds, even if the latter are willing to pay higher interest rates. It is an example of market imperfection, or market failure, as the price… …   Wikipedia


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