To branch out
Branch Branch, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Branched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Branching}.] 1. To shoot or spread in branches; to separate into branches; to ramify. [1913 Webster]

2. To divide into separate parts or subdivision. [1913 Webster]

{To branch off}, to form a branch or a separate part; to diverge.

{To branch out}, to speak diffusively; to extend one's discourse to other topics than the main one; also, to enlarge the scope of one's business, etc. [1913 Webster]

To branch out into a long disputation. --Spectator. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To sit out — Sit Sit, v. i. [imp. {Sat}({Sate}, archaic); p. p. {Sat} ({Sitten}, obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Sitting}.] [OE. sitten, AS. sittan; akin to OS. sittian, OFries. sitta, D. zitten, G. sitzen, OHG. sizzen, Icel. sitja, SW. sitta, Dan. sidde, Goth. sitan …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To branch off — Branch Branch, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Branched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Branching}.] 1. To shoot or spread in branches; to separate into branches; to ramify. [1913 Webster] 2. To divide into separate parts or subdivision. [1913 Webster] {To branch off},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • branch out — verb a) to expand in the manner of branches The chart starts in the center and branches out from there. b) to attempt something new or different, but related Studying Latin may make it easier to branch out into Spanish or Italian …   Wiktionary

  • to hold out an olive branch — Olive Ol ive, n. [F., fr. L. oliva, akin to Gr. ?. See {Oil}.] 1. (Bot.) (a) A tree ({Olea Europ[ae]a}) with small oblong or elliptical leaves, axillary clusters of flowers, and oval, one seeded drupes. The tree has been cultivated for its fruit… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To grow out of — Grow Grow (gr[=o]), v. i. [imp. {Grew} (gr[udd]); p. p. {Grown (gr[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Growing}.] [AS. gr[=o]wan; akin to D. groeijen, Icel. gr[=o]a, Dan. groe, Sw. gro. Cf. {Green}, {Grass}.] 1. To increase in size by a natural and organic… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • branch out — {v.} To add new interests or activities; begin doing other things also. * /First Jane collected stamps; then she branched out and collected coins, too./ * /John started a television repair shop; when he did well, he branched out and began selling …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • branch out — {v.} To add new interests or activities; begin doing other things also. * /First Jane collected stamps; then she branched out and collected coins, too./ * /John started a television repair shop; when he did well, he branched out and began selling …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Branch — Branch, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Branched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Branching}.] 1. To shoot or spread in branches; to separate into branches; to ramify. [1913 Webster] 2. To divide into separate parts or subdivision. [1913 Webster] {To branch off}, to form …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • branch — branchless, adj. branchlike, adj. /branch, brahnch/, n. 1. a division or subdivision of the stem or axis of a tree, shrub, or other plant. 2. a limb, offshoot, or ramification of any main stem: the branches of a deer s antlers. 3. any member or… …   Universalium

  • Out-of-order execution — In computer engineering, out of order execution (OoOE or OOE) is a paradigm used in most high performance microprocessors to make use of instruction cycles that would otherwise be wasted by a certain type of costly delay. In this paradigm, a… …   Wikipedia

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