To bear off
Bear Bear (b[^a]r), v. i. 1. To produce, as fruit; to be fruitful, in opposition to barrenness. [1913 Webster]

This age to blossom, and the next to bear. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To suffer, as in carrying a burden. [1913 Webster]

But man is born to bear. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

3. To endure with patience; to be patient. [1913 Webster]

I can not, can not bear. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. To press; -- with on or upon, or against. [1913 Webster]

These men bear hard on the suspected party. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

5. To take effect; to have influence or force; as, to bring matters to bear. [1913 Webster]

6. To relate or refer; -- with on or upon; as, how does this bear on the question? [1913 Webster]

7. To have a certain meaning, intent, or effect. [1913 Webster]

Her sentence bore that she should stand a certain time upon the platform. --Hawthorne. [1913 Webster]

8. To be situated, as to the point of compass, with respect to something else; as, the land bears N. by E. [1913 Webster]

{To bear against}, to approach for attack or seizure; as, a lion bears against his prey. [Obs.]

{To bear away} (Naut.), to change the course of a ship, and make her run before the wind.

{To bear back}, to retreat. ``Bearing back from the blows of their sable antagonist.'' --Sir W. Scott.

{To bear down upon} (Naut.), to approach from the windward side; as, the fleet bore down upon the enemy.

{To bear in with} (Naut.), to run or tend toward; as, a ship bears in with the land.

{To bear off} (Naut.), to steer away, as from land.

{To bear up}. (a) To be supported; to have fortitude; to be firm; not to sink; as, to bear up under afflictions. (b) (Naut.) To put the helm up (or to windward) and so put the ship before the wind; to bear away. --Hamersly.

{To bear upon} (Mil.), to be pointed or situated so as to affect; to be pointed directly against, or so as to hit (the object); as, to bring or plant guns so as to bear upon a fort or a ship; the artillery bore upon the center.

{To bear up to}, to tend or move toward; as, to bear up to one another.

{To bear with}, to endure; to be indulgent to; to forbear to resent, oppose, or punish. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To bear off — Bear Bear (b[^a]r), v. t. [imp. {Bore} (b[=o]r) (formerly {Bare} (b[^a]r)); p. p. {Born} (b[^o]rn), {Borne} (b[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Bearing}.] [OE. beren, AS. beran, beoran, to bear, carry, produce; akin to D. baren to bring forth, G. geb[… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To carry off — Carry Car ry, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Carried}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Carrying}.] [OF. carier, charier, F. carrier, to cart, from OF. car, char, F. car, car. See {Car}.] 1. To convey or transport in any manner from one place to another; to bear; often… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bring off — Bring Bring, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Brought}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bringing}.] [OE. bringen, AS. bringan; akin to OS. brengian, D. brengen, Fries. brenga, OHG. bringan, G. bringen, Goth. briggan.] 1. To convey to the place where the speaker is or is to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To wear off — Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put off — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cast off — Cast Cast (k[.a]st), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cast}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Casting}.] [Cf. Dan. kaste, Icel. & Sw. kasta; perh. akin to L. {gerere} to bear, carry. E. jest.] 1. To send or drive by force; to throw; to fling; to hurl; to impel. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To draw off — draw draw (dr[add]), v. t. [imp. {Drew} (dr[udd]); p. p. {Drawn} (dr[add]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Drawing}.] [OE. dra[yogh]en, drahen, draien, drawen, AS. dragan; akin to Icel. & Sw. draga, Dan. drage to draw, carry, and prob. to OS. dragan to bear,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To throw off — Throw Throw, v. t. [imp. {Threw} (thr[udd]); p. p. {Thrown} (thr[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Throwing}.] [OE. [thorn]rowen, [thorn]rawen, to throw, to twist, AS. [thorn]r[=a]wan to twist, to whirl; akin to D. draaijen, G. drehen, OHG. dr[=a]jan, L.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pay off — Pay Pay, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Paid}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Paying}.] [OE. paien, F. payer, fr. L. pacare to pacify, appease, fr. pax, pacis, peace. See {Peace}.] 1. To satisfy, or content; specifically, to satisfy (another person) for service rendered …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold off — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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