To be on the stretch
Stretch Stretch, n. 1. Act of stretching, or state of being stretched; reach; effort; struggle; strain; as, a stretch of the limbs; a stretch of the imagination. [1913 Webster]

By stretch of arms the distant shore to gain. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

Those put a lawful authority upon the stretch, to the abuse of yower, under the color of prerogative. --L'Estrange. [1913 Webster]

2. A continuous line or surface; a continuous space of time; as, grassy stretches of land. [1913 Webster]

A great stretch of cultivated country. --W. Black. [1913 Webster]

But all of them left me a week at a stretch. --E. Eggleston. [1913 Webster]

3. The extent to which anything may be stretched. [1913 Webster]

Quotations, in their utmost stretch, can signify no more than that Luther lay under severe agonies of mind. --Atterbury. [1913 Webster]

This is the utmost stretch that nature can. --Granville. [1913 Webster]

4. (Naut.) The reach or extent of a vessel's progress on one tack; a tack or board. [1913 Webster]

5. Course; direction; as, the stretch of seams of coal. [1913 Webster]

{To be on the stretch}, to be obliged to use one's utmost powers.

{Home stretch}. See under {Home}, a. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To be on the tenter-hooks — Tenter Ten ter, n. [OE. tenture, tentoure, OF. tenture a stretching, spreading, F. tenture hangings, tapestry, from L. tendere, tentum, to stretch. See {Tend} to move.] A machine or frame for stretching cloth by means of hooks, called tenter… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be on the tenters — Tenter Ten ter, n. [OE. tenture, tentoure, OF. tenture a stretching, spreading, F. tenture hangings, tapestry, from L. tendere, tentum, to stretch. See {Tend} to move.] A machine or frame for stretching cloth by means of hooks, called tenter… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be on the rack — Rack Rack, n. [Probably fr. D. rek, rekbank, a rack, rekken to stretch; akin to G. reck, reckbank, a rack, recken to stretch, Dan. r[ae]kke, Sw. r[ a]cka, Icel. rekja to spread out, Goth. refrakjan to stretch out; cf. L. porrigere, Gr. ore gein.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be on tenterhooks — Tenter Ten ter, n. [OE. tenture, tentoure, OF. tenture a stretching, spreading, F. tenture hangings, tapestry, from L. tendere, tentum, to stretch. See {Tend} to move.] A machine or frame for stretching cloth by means of hooks, called tenter… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To enter on the boards — Board Board (b[=o]rd), n. [OE. bord, AS. bord board, shipboard; akin to bred plank, Icel. bor[eth] board, side of a ship, Goth. f[=o]tu baurd footstool, D. bord board, G. brett, bort. See def. 8. [root]92.] 1. A piece of timber sawed thin, and of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To stand on — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • On the Road — For other uses, see On the Road (disambiguation). On the Road   …   Wikipedia

  • On the point — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • On the point — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put on — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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