To bank up a fire
Bank Bank, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Banked}(b[a^][ng]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Banking}.] 1. To raise a mound or dike about; to inclose, defend, or fortify with a bank; to embank. ``Banked well with earth.'' --Holland. [1913 Webster]

2. To heap or pile up; as, to bank sand. [1913 Webster]

3. To pass by the banks of. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. (Engineering) To build (a roadway or railroad) with an inclination at a curve in the road, so as to counteract centrifugal forces acting on vehicles moving rapiudly around the curve, thus reducing the danger of vehicles overturning at a curve; as, the raceway was steeply banked at the curves. [PJC]

{To bank a fire}, {To bank up a fire}, to cover the coals or embers with ashes or cinders, thus keeping the fire low but alive. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To bank a fire — Bank Bank, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Banked}(b[a^][ng]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Banking}.] 1. To raise a mound or dike about; to inclose, defend, or fortify with a bank; to embank. Banked well with earth. Holland. [1913 Webster] 2. To heap or pile up; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take up — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take up arms — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take up the gauntlet — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bank up — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms bank up : present tense I/you/we/they bank up he/she/it banks up present participle banking up past tense banked up past participle banked up 1) to make something into a pile Soil was banked up against the… …   English dictionary

  • To run up — Run Run, v. i. [imp. {Ran}or {Run}; p. p. {Run}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Running}.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To run down a coast — Run Run, v. i. [imp. {Ran}or {Run}; p. p. {Run}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Running}.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bank — Bank, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Banked}(b[a^][ng]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Banking}.] 1. To raise a mound or dike about; to inclose, defend, or fortify with a bank; to embank. Banked well with earth. Holland. [1913 Webster] 2. To heap or pile up; as, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bank — I. /bæŋk / (say bangk) noun 1. a long pile or mass: bank of earth; bank of snow; bank of clouds. 2. a slope or acclivity. 3. Physical Geography the slope immediately bordering the course of a river along which the water normally runs. 4.… …   Australian English dictionary

  • bank — bank1 /bangk/, n. 1. a long pile or heap; mass: a bank of earth; a bank of clouds. 2. a slope or acclivity. 3. Physical Geog. the slope immediately bordering a stream course along which the water normally runs. 4. a broad elevation of the sea… …   Universalium

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