To abate into a freehold
Abate A*bate" ([.a]*b[=a]t"), v. i. [See {Abate}, v. t.] 1. To decrease, or become less in strength or violence; as, pain abates, a storm abates. [1913 Webster]

The fury of Glengarry . . . rapidly abated. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

2. To be defeated, or come to naught; to fall through; to fail; as, a writ abates. [1913 Webster]

{To abate into a freehold}, {To abate in lands} (Law), to enter into a freehold after the death of the last possessor, and before the heir takes possession. See {Abatement}, 4. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To subside; decrease; intermit; decline; diminish; lessen.

Usage: To {Abate}, {Subside}. These words, as here compared, imply a coming down from some previously raised or excited state. Abate expresses this in respect to degrees, and implies a diminution of force or of intensity; as, the storm abates, the cold abates, the force of the wind abates; or, the wind abates, a fever abates. Subside (to settle down) has reference to a previous state of agitation or commotion; as, the waves subside after a storm, the wind subsides into a calm. When the words are used figuratively, the same distinction should be observed. If we conceive of a thing as having different degrees of intensity or strength, the word to be used is abate. Thus we say, a man's anger abates, the ardor of one's love abates, ``Winter's rage abates''. But if the image be that of a sinking down into quiet from preceding excitement or commotion, the word to be used is subside; as, the tumult of the people subsides, the public mind subsided into a calm. The same is the case with those emotions which are tumultuous in their nature; as, his passion subsides, his joy quickly subsided, his grief subsided into a pleasing melancholy. Yet if, in such cases, we were thinking of the degree of violence of the emotion, we might use abate; as, his joy will abate in the progress of time; and so in other instances. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To abate into a freehold — Freehold Free hold , n. (Lw) An estate in real property, of inheritance (in fee simple or fee tail) or for life; or the tenure by which such estate is held. Kent. Burrill. [1913 Webster] {To abate into a freehold}. See under {Abate}. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To abate in lands — Abate A*bate ([.a]*b[=a]t ), v. i. [See {Abate}, v. t.] 1. To decrease, or become less in strength or violence; as, pain abates, a storm abates. [1913 Webster] The fury of Glengarry . . . rapidly abated. Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 2. To be defeated …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abate — A*bate ([.a]*b[=a]t ), v. i. [See {Abate}, v. t.] 1. To decrease, or become less in strength or violence; as, pain abates, a storm abates. [1913 Webster] The fury of Glengarry . . . rapidly abated. Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 2. To be defeated, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Freehold — Free hold , n. (Lw) An estate in real property, of inheritance (in fee simple or fee tail) or for life; or the tenure by which such estate is held. Kent. Burrill. [1913 Webster] {To abate into a freehold}. See under {Abate}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • New Jersey — This article is about the U.S. state of New Jersey. For other uses, see New Jersey (disambiguation). NJ redirects here. For other uses, see Nj (disambiguation) …   Wikipedia

  • property law — Introduction       principles, policies, and rules by which disputes over property are to be resolved and by which property transactions may be structured. What distinguishes property law from other kinds of law is that property law deals with… …   Universalium

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