Thrive Thrive (thr[imac]v), v. i. [imp. {Throve} (thr[=o]v) or {Thrived} (thr[imac]vd); p. p. {Thrived} or {Thriven} (thr[i^]v"'n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Thriving}.] [OE. [thorn]riven, Icel. [thorn]r[=i]fask; probably originally, to grasp for one's self, from [thorn]r[=i]fa to grasp; akin to Dan. trives to thrive, Sw. trifvas. Cf. {Thrift}.] 1. To prosper by industry, economy, and good management of property; to increase in goods and estate; as, a farmer thrives by good husbandry. [1913 Webster]

Diligence and humility is the way to thrive in the riches of the understanding, as well as in gold. --I. Watts. [1913 Webster]

2. To prosper in any business; to have increase or success. ``They by vices thrive.'' --Sandys. [1913 Webster]

O son, why sit we here, each other viewing Idly, while Satan, our great author, thrives? --Milton. [1913 Webster]

And so she throve and prospered. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

3. To increase in bulk or stature; to grow vigorously or luxuriantly, as a plant; to flourish; as, young cattle thrive in rich pastures; trees thrive in a good soil. [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • thrive — [θraıv] v past tense thrived or throve [θrəuv US θrouv] past participle thrived [i]formal [Date: 1200 1300; : Old Norse; Origin: thrifask, probably from thrifa to seize ] to become very successful or very strong and healthy ▪ plants that thrive… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • thrive — [θraɪv] verb thrived PASTTENSE or throve [θrəʊv ǁ θroʊv] thrived PASTPART [intransitive] if a company, market, or place is thriving, it is very successful and making a lot of money …   Financial and business terms

  • thrive — [ θraıv ] verb intransitive * to become very successful, happy, or healthy: Children thrive when given plenty of love and attention. This type of plant thrives in cool conditions. thrive on phrasal verb transitive thrive on something to become… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • thrive — c.1200, from O.N. þrifask to thrive, originally grasp to oneself, probably from O.N. þrifa to clutch, grasp, grip (Cf. Swed. trifvas, Dan. trives to thrive, flourish ), of unknown origin …   Etymology dictionary

  • thrive — thrive; thrive·less; …   English syllables

  • thrive — index gain, germinate, increase, prevail (triumph), proliferate, succeed (attain) Burton s Legal Thesa …   Law dictionary

  • thrive — *succeed, prosper, flourish Analogous words: *increase, augment, multiply, enlarge Antonyms: languish …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • thrive — The past and past participle of the verb are normally both thrived, although throve (past) and thriven (past participle) are occasionally used in BrE …   Modern English usage

  • thrive — [v] do well advance, arrive, batten, bear fruit, bloom, blossom, boom, burgeon, develop, flourish, get ahead*, get fat*, get on*, get places*, get there*, grow, grow rich, increase, make a go*, mushroom*, progress, prosper, radiate, rise, score* …   New thesaurus

  • thrive — ► VERB (past thrived or throve; past part. thrived or thriven) 1) grow or develop well or vigorously. 2) prosper; flourish. ORIGIN Old Norse, grasp, get hold of ; related to THRIFT(Cf. ↑thrift) …   English terms dictionary

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