Thirling
Thirl \Thirl\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Thirled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Thirling}.] [See {Thrill}.] To bore; to drill or thrill. See {Thrill}. [Obs. or Prov.] [1913 Webster]

That with a spear was thirled his breast bone. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • thirling — thirl·ing …   English syllables

  • thirling — liŋ noun ( s) Etymology: from gerund of thirl (II) : a cross hole or short passage between breasts or headings in a coal mine usually for ventilation …   Useful english dictionary

  • List of abbeys and priories in England — Contents 1 Overview 1.1 Article layout 2 Abbreviations and key …   Wikipedia

  • Thurling — This interesting and uncommon name is of Anglo Saxon origin, and is a variant form of the locational surname Terling or Tarling, from the place called Terling near Witham in Essex. The place is recorded circa 1050 as Terlinges , and in the… …   Surnames reference

  • Thirl — Thirl, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Thirled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Thirling}.] [See {Thrill}.] To bore; to drill or thrill. See {Thrill}. [Obs. or Prov.] [1913 Webster] That with a spear was thirled his breast bone. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Thirled — Thirl Thirl, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Thirled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Thirling}.] [See {Thrill}.] To bore; to drill or thrill. See {Thrill}. [Obs. or Prov.] [1913 Webster] That with a spear was thirled his breast bone. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • thurl — I. ˈthər(.ə)l dialect England variant of thirl II. noun ( s) Etymology: perhaps from English dialect thirl, thurl gaunt : the hip joint in cattle see cow illustration * * * …   Useful english dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”