Thick stuff
Thick Thick (th[i^]k), a. [Compar. {Thicker} (-[~e]r); superl. {Thickest}.] [OE. thicke, AS. [thorn]icce; akin to D. dik, OS. thikki, OHG. dicchi thick, dense, G. dick thick, Icel. [thorn]ykkr, [thorn]j["o]kkr, and probably to Gael. & Ir. tiugh. Cf. {Tight}.] 1. Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; -- said of a solid body; as, a timber seven inches thick. [1913 Webster]

Were it as thick as is a branched oak. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

My little finger shall be thicker than my father's loins. --1 Kings xii. 10. [1913 Webster]

2. Having more depth or extent from one surface to its opposite than usual; not thin or slender; as, a thick plank; thick cloth; thick paper; thick neck. [1913 Webster]

3. Dense; not thin; inspissated; as, thick vapors. Also used figuratively; as, thick darkness. [1913 Webster]

Make the gruel thick and slab. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. Not transparent or clear; hence, turbid, muddy, or misty; as, the water of a river is apt to be thick after a rain. ``In a thick, misty day.'' --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

5. Abundant, close, or crowded in space; closely set; following in quick succession; frequently recurring. [1913 Webster]

The people were gathered thick together. --Luke xi. 29. [1913 Webster]

Black was the forest; thick with beech it stood. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

6. Not having due distinction of syllables, or good articulation; indistinct; as, a thick utterance. [1913 Webster]

7. Deep; profound; as, thick sleep. [R.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

8. Dull; not quick; as, thick of fearing. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

His dimensions to any thick sight were invincible. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

9. Intimate; very friendly; familiar. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

We have been thick ever since. --T. Hughes. [1913 Webster]

Note: Thick is often used in the formation of compounds, most of which are self-explaining; as, thick-barred, thick-bodied, thick-coming, thick-cut, thick-flying, thick-growing, thick-leaved, thick-lipped, thick-necked, thick-planted, thick-ribbed, thick-shelled, thick-woven, and the like. [1913 Webster]

{Thick register}. (Phon.) See the Note under {Register}, n., 7.

{Thick stuff} (Naut.), all plank that is more than four inches thick and less than twelve. --J. Knowles. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Dense; close; compact; solid; gross; coarse. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • thick stuff — noun : sided ship s timber more than 4 inches thick and less than 12 …   Useful english dictionary

  • Thick — (th[i^]k), a. [Compar. {Thicker} ( [ e]r); superl. {Thickest}.] [OE. thicke, AS. [thorn]icce; akin to D. dik, OS. thikki, OHG. dicchi thick, dense, G. dick thick, Icel. [thorn]ykkr, [thorn]j[ o]kkr, and probably to Gael. & Ir. tiugh. Cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Thick register — Thick Thick (th[i^]k), a. [Compar. {Thicker} ( [ e]r); superl. {Thickest}.] [OE. thicke, AS. [thorn]icce; akin to D. dik, OS. thikki, OHG. dicchi thick, dense, G. dick thick, Icel. [thorn]ykkr, [thorn]j[ o]kkr, and probably to Gael. & Ir. tiugh.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • thick — 1. (thick) (3148↑, 472↓) nice ass, nice legs, not skinny, with meat on your bones. thickness is the shit. Damn that girl is thick yo! Author: Bryant http://thick.urbanup.com/1787 2. (Thick) (2401↑, 392↓) A woman with a perfect body, filled in in… …   Urban English dictionary

  • thick — 1. mod. stupid; thickheaded. □ She’s sort of thick, but she means well. □ Why are you so thick about money? 2. mod. involved (with someone). □ Sam and Mary are really thick. □ …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • Small-stuff — is a nautical and knot tying term for thin string or twine, as opposed to the thick, heavy ropes that are more often used in sailing. It is commonly used in a whipping to bind the ends of ropes to prevent fraying.Historically, the term referred… …   Wikipedia

  • o|ver|stuff — «OH vuhr STUHF», transitive verb. 1. to stuff too full. 2. to make (upholstered furniture) soft and comfortable by thick padding: »an overstuffed chair …   Useful english dictionary

  • Fine stuff — fine fine (f[imac]n), a. [Compar. {finer} (f[imac]n [ e]r); superl. {finest}.] [F. fin, LL. finus fine, pure, fr. L. finire to finish; cf. finitus, p. p., finished, completed (hence the sense accomplished, perfect.) See {Finish}, and cf. {Finite} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Inch stuff — Inch Inch, a. Measuring an inch in any dimension, whether length, breadth, or thickness; used in composition; as, a two inch cable; a four inch plank. [1913 Webster] {Inch stuff}, boards, etc., sawed one inch thick. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • greasy kid's stuff — heavy hair dressing, thick hair oil    None of that greasy kid s stuff on my hair. I use a natural product …   English idioms

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