The period
Period Pe"ri*od, n. [L. periodus, Gr. ? a going round, a way round, a circumference, a period of time; ? round, about + ? a way: cf. F. p['e]riode.] 1. A portion of time as limited and determined by some recurring phenomenon, as by the completion of a revolution of one of the heavenly bodies; a division of time, as a series of years, months, or days, in which something is completed, and ready to recommence and go on in the same order; as, the period of the sun, or the earth, or a comet. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence: A stated and recurring interval of time; more generally, an interval of time specified or left indefinite; a certain series of years, months, days, or the like; a time; a cycle; an age; an epoch; as, the period of the Roman republic. [1913 Webster]

How by art to make plants more lasting than their ordinary period. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

3. (Geol.) One of the great divisions of geological time; as, the Tertiary period; the Glacial period. See the Chart of {Geology}. [1913 Webster]

4. The termination or completion of a revolution, cycle, series of events, single event, or act; hence, a limit; a bound; an end; a conclusion. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

So spake the archangel Michael; then paused, As at the world's great period. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Evils which shall never end till eternity hath a period. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

This is the period of my ambition. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. (Rhet.) A complete sentence, from one full stop to another; esp., a well-proportioned, harmonious sentence. ``Devolved his rounded periods.'' --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

Periods are beautiful when they are not too long. --B. Johnson. [1913 Webster]

Note: The period, according to Heyse, is a compound sentence consisting of a protasis and apodosis; according to Becker, it is the appropriate form for the co["o]rdinate propositions related by antithesis or causality. --Gibbs. [1913 Webster]

6. (Print.) The punctuation point [.] that marks the end of a complete sentence, or of an abbreviated word. [1913 Webster]

7. (Math.) One of several similar sets of figures or terms usually marked by points or commas placed at regular intervals, as in numeration, in the extraction of roots, and in circulating decimals. [1913 Webster]

8. (Med.) The time of the exacerbation and remission of a disease, or of the paroxysm and intermission. [1913 Webster]

9. (Mus.) A complete musical sentence. [1913 Webster]

{The period}, the present or current time, as distinguished from all other times. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Time; date; epoch; era; age; duration; limit; bound; end; conclusion; determination. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • The Fens — The Fens, also known as the Fenland, is a geographic area in eastern England, in the United Kingdom. The Fenland primarily lies around the coast of the Wash; it reaches into two Government regions (East Anglia and the East Midlands), four modern… …   Wikipedia

  • Period — Pe ri*od, n. [L. periodus, Gr. ? a going round, a way round, a circumference, a period of time; ? round, about + ? a way: cf. F. p[ e]riode.] 1. A portion of time as limited and determined by some recurring phenomenon, as by the completion of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions — (1962), by Thomas Kuhn, is an analysis of the history of science. Its publication was a landmark event in the sociology of knowledge, and popularized the terms paradigm and paradigm shift .HistoryThe work was first published as a monograph in the …   Wikipedia

  • Period — or periodic may refer to:Language and literature* Full stop, a punctuation mark indicating the end of a sentence or phrase * Periodic sentence, a sentence that is not grammatically complete until its end * The final book in Dennis Cooper s George …   Wikipedia

  • The Moody Blues — in concert at the Chumash Casino Resort in Santa Ynez, California in 2005. L R: Justin Hayward, Graeme Edge and John Lodge. Background information Origin …   Wikipedia

  • The Doobie Brothers — Doobie Brothers in Berkeley, California, September 11, 1982. L to R: : Michael Hossack, Patrick Simmons, John Hartman, Tom Johnston. Background information Origin San Jose …   Wikipedia

  • The Cantos — by Ezra Pound is a long, incomplete poem in 120 sections, each of which is a canto . Most of it was written between 1915 and 1962, although much of the early work was abandoned and the early cantos, as finally published, date from 1922 onwards.… …   Wikipedia

  • The Vicar of Bray (song) — The Vicar of Bray is a satirical song (Roud # 4998) recounting the career of the Vicar of Bray and his contortions of principle in order to retain his ecclesiastic office despite the changes in the Established Church through the course of several …   Wikipedia

  • The Rosicrucian Cosmo-Conception — or Mystic Christianity is a Rosicrucian text, written by Max Heindel (ISBN 0 911274 34 0) Western Wisdom Teachings The first edition was printed in November 1909, it has little changed since then and it is considered to be Max Heindel s magnum… …   Wikipedia

  • The Ontario Regiment (RCAC) — Crest of The Ontario Regiment (RCAC) Active 14 Sep, 1866 present Country …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”