The forks of a road

The forks of a road
Fork Fork (f[^o]rk), n. [AS. forc, fr. L. furca. Cf. {Fourch['e]}, {Furcate}.] 1. An instrument consisting of a handle with a shank terminating in two or more prongs or tines, which are usually of metal, parallel and slightly curved; -- used for piercing, holding, taking up, or pitching anything. [1913 Webster]

2. Anything furcate or like a fork in shape, or furcate at the extremity; as, a tuning fork. [1913 Webster]

3. One of the parts into which anything is furcated or divided; a prong; a branch of a stream, a road, etc.; a barbed point, as of an arrow. [1913 Webster]

Let it fall . . . though the fork invade The region of my heart. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

A thunderbolt with three forks. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

4. The place where a division or a union occurs; the angle or opening between two branches or limbs; as, the fork of a river, a tree, or a road. [1913 Webster]

5. The gibbet. [Obs.] --Bp. Butler. [1913 Webster]

{Fork beam} (Shipbuilding), a half beam to support a deck, where hatchways occur.

{Fork chuck} (Wood Turning), a lathe center having two prongs for driving the work.

{Fork head}. (a) The barbed head of an arrow. (b) The forked end of a rod which forms part of a knuckle joint.

{In fork}. (Mining) A mine is said to be in fork, or an engine to ``have the water in fork,'' when all the water is drawn out of the mine. --Ure.

{The forks of a river} or {The forks of a road}, the branches into which it divides, or which come together to form it; the place where separation or union takes place. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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