Dog Dog (d[o^]g), n. [AS. docga; akin to D. dog mastiff, Dan. dogge, Sw. dogg.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A quadruped of the genus {Canis}, esp. the domestic dog ({Canis familiaris}).

Note: The dog is distinguished above all others of the inferior animals for intelligence, docility, and attachment to man. There are numerous carefully bred varieties, as the {akita}, {beagle}, {bloodhound}, {bulldog}, {coachdog}, {collie}, {Danish dog}, {foxhound}, {greyhound}, {mastiff}, {pointer}, {poodle}, {St. Bernard}, {setter}, {spaniel}, {spitz dog}, {terrier}, {German shepherd}, {pit bull}, {Chihuahua}, etc. There are also many mixed breeds, and partially domesticated varieties, as well as wild dogs, like the dingo and dhole. (See these names in the Vocabulary.) [1913 Webster +PJC]

2. A mean, worthless fellow; a wretch. [1913 Webster]

What is thy servant, which is but a dog, that he should do this great thing? -- 2 Kings viii. 13 (Rev. Ver. ) [1913 Webster]

3. A fellow; -- used humorously or contemptuously; as, a sly dog; a lazy dog. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

4. (Astron.) One of the two constellations, Canis Major and Canis Minor, or the Greater Dog and the Lesser Dog. Canis Major contains the Dog Star (Sirius). [1913 Webster]

5. An iron for holding wood in a fireplace; a firedog; an andiron. [1913 Webster]

6. (Mech.) (a) A grappling iron, with a claw or claws, for fastening into wood or other heavy articles, for the purpose of raising or moving them. (b) An iron with fangs fastening a log in a saw pit, or on the carriage of a sawmill. (c) A piece in machinery acting as a catch or clutch; especially, the carrier of a lathe, also, an adjustable stop to change motion, as in a machine tool. [1913 Webster]

7. an ugly or crude person, especially an ugly woman. [slang] [PJC]

8. a {hot dog}. [slang] [PJC]

Note: Dog is used adjectively or in composition, commonly in the sense of relating to, or characteristic of, a dog. It is also used to denote a male; as, dog fox or g-fox, a male fox; dog otter or dog-otter, dog wolf, etc.; -- also to denote a thing of cheap or mean quality; as, dog Latin. [1913 Webster]

{A dead dog}, a thing of no use or value. --1 Sam. xxiv. 14.

{A dog in the manger}, an ugly-natured person who prevents others from enjoying what would be an advantage to them but is none to him.

{Dog ape} (Zo["o]l.), a male ape.

{Dog cabbage}, or {Dog's cabbage} (Bot.), a succulent herb, native to the Mediterranean region ({Thelygonum Cynocrambe}).

{Dog cheap}, very cheap. See under {Cheap}.

{Dog ear} (Arch.), an acroterium. [Colloq.]

{Dog flea} (Zo["o]l.), a species of flea ({Pulex canis}) which infests dogs and cats, and is often troublesome to man. In America it is the common flea. See {Flea}, and {Aphaniptera}.

{Dog grass} (Bot.), a grass ({Triticum caninum}) of the same genus as wheat.

{Dog Latin}, barbarous Latin; as, the dog Latin of pharmacy.

{Dog lichen} (Bot.), a kind of lichen ({Peltigera canina}) growing on earth, rocks, and tree trunks, -- a lobed expansion, dingy green above and whitish with fuscous veins beneath.

{Dog louse} (Zo["o]l.), a louse that infests the dog, esp. {H[ae]matopinus piliferus}; another species is {Trichodectes latus}.

{Dog power}, a machine operated by the weight of a dog traveling in a drum, or on an endless track, as for churning.

{Dog salmon} (Zo["o]l.), a salmon of northwest America and northern Asia; -- the {gorbuscha}; -- called also {holia}, and {hone}.

{Dog shark}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Dogfish}.

{Dog's meat}, meat fit only for dogs; refuse; offal.

{Dog Star}. See in the Vocabulary.

{Dog wheat} (Bot.), Dog grass.

{Dog whelk} (Zo["o]l.), any species of univalve shells of the family {Nassid[ae]}, esp. the {Nassa reticulata} of England.

{To give to the dogs}, or {To throw to the dogs}, to throw away as useless. ``Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.'' --Shak.

{To go to the dogs}, to go to ruin; to be ruined. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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