termor
Termer Term"er, n. 1. One who resorted to London during the law term only, in order to practice tricks, to carry on intrigues, or the like. [Obs.] [Written also {termor}.] --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster]

2. (Law) One who has an estate for a term of years or for life. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Termor — Term or, n. (Law) Same as {Termer}, 2. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • termor — index lodger Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • termor — [tʉr′mər] n. [ME < Anglo Fr termer < terme: see TERM2 & ER] Law a person holding an estate for a certain period of years or for life …   English World dictionary

  • termor — /terr meuhr/, n. Law. a person who has an estate for a term of years or for life. [1250 1300; TERM + OR2; r. ME termur < AF termer (see ER2)] * * * …   Universalium

  • Termor — A person who held land for a set term, i.e. a number of years or until he died. [< AnNor. terme = set period of time] …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • termor — n. one who owns an estate for a certain period of time or for life (Law) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Termor — ♦ A lessee, enjoying the possession of land for a specified period or term, while the lessor retains title. (Hogue, Arthur R. Origins of the Common Law, 258) …   Medieval glossary

  • termor — ter·mor …   English syllables

  • termor — /ˈtɜmə/ (say termuh) noun (in law) someone who has an estate for a term of years or for life. {Middle English termer, from Anglo French} …   Australian English dictionary

  • termor — /tarmar/ He that holds lands or tenements for a term of years or life. But we generally confine the application of the word to a person entitled for a term of years …   Black's law dictionary

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