Temporality Tem`po*ral"i*ty, n.; pl. {Temporalities}. [L. temporalitas, in LL., possessions of the church: cf. F. temporalit['e].] 1. The state or quality of being temporary; -- opposed to perpetuity. [1913 Webster]

2. The laity; temporality. [Obs.] --Sir T. More. [1913 Webster]

3. That which pertains to temporal welfare; material interests; especially, the revenue of an ecclesiastic proceeding from lands, tenements, or lay fees, tithes, and the like; -- chiefly used in the plural. [1913 Webster]

Supreme head, . . . under God, of the spirituality and temporality of the same church. --Fuller. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Temporalities — are the secular properties and possessions of the Christian Church. It is most often used to describe those properties that were used to support a bishop or other religious person or establishment. It s opposite description would be the… …   Wikipedia

  • temporalities — The revenues of a parish of the Roman Catholic Church which are derived from pew rents, Sunday and other collections, graveyard charges, school fees and donations. The pastor of the parish as the administrator and agent of the archbishop, who is… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • temporalities — noun the temporal or worldly possessions of the clergy …   Wiktionary

  • Temporalities — Used of the lay or secular possessions of the Church, but particularly of those which provided income and revenue for religious establishments and senior clerics such as bishops. [< Lat. temporalitas = the temporal world] Cf. De intendendo;… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • temporalities — n. impermanence, transience …   English contemporary dictionary

  • temporalities — the properties and revenues of a religious body or a member of the clergy. → temporality …   English new terms dictionary

  • Temporalities — temporalia Latin 1) The non spiritual holdings of the church such as lands, markets and liberties. (Waugh, Scott. England in the Reign of Edward III, 238) 2) Secular possessions of ecclesiastics. (Sayles, George O. The King s Parliament of… …   Medieval glossary

  • temporalities — /tempaKelatiyz/ In English law, the lay fees of bishops, with which their churches are endowed or permitted to be endowed by the liberality of the sovereign, and in virtue of which they become barons and lords of parliament. In a wider sense, the …   Black's law dictionary

  • guardian of the temporalities — See custos temporalium …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Bishop of Elphin — Christianity portal The Bishop of Elphin is an episcopal title which takes its name after the village of Elphin in County Roscommon, Ireland. In the Roman Catholic Church it remains a separate title, but in the Church of Ireland it has b …   Wikipedia

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