Temper Tem"per, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tempered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Tempering}.] [AS. temprian or OF. temper, F. temp['e]rer, and (in sense 3) temper, L. temperare, akin to tempus time. Cf. {Temporal}, {Distemper}, {Tamper}.] 1. To mingle in due proportion; to prepare by combining; to modify, as by adding some new element; to qualify, as by an ingredient; hence, to soften; to mollify; to assuage; to soothe; to calm. [1913 Webster]

Puritan austerity was so tempered by Dutch indifference, that mercy itself could not have dictated a milder system. --Bancroft. [1913 Webster]

Woman! lovely woman! nature made thee To temper man: we had been brutes without you. --Otway. [1913 Webster]

But thy fire Shall be more tempered, and thy hope far higher. --Byron. [1913 Webster]

She [the Goddess of Justice] threw darkness and clouds about her, that tempered the light into a thousand beautiful shades and colors. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

2. To fit together; to adjust; to accomodate. [1913 Webster]

Thy sustenance . . . serving to the appetite of the eater, tempered itself to every man's liking. --Wisdom xvi. 21. [1913 Webster]

3. (Metal.) To bring to a proper degree of hardness; as, to temper iron or steel. [1913 Webster]

The tempered metals clash, and yield a silver sound. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. To govern; to manage. [A Latinism & Obs.] [1913 Webster]

With which the damned ghosts he governeth, And furies rules, and Tartare tempereth. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

5. To moisten to a proper consistency and stir thoroughly, as clay for making brick, loam for molding, etc. [1913 Webster]

6. (Mus.) To adjust, as the mathematical scale to the actual scale, or to that in actual use. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To soften; mollify; assuage; soothe; calm. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Temper — Tem per, n. 1. The state of any compound substance which results from the mixture of various ingredients; due mixture of different qualities; just combination; as, the temper of mortar. [1913 Webster] 2. Constitution of body; temperament; in old… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • temper — [tem′pər] vt. [ME tempren < OE temprian & OFr temprer, both < L temperare, to observe proper measure, mix, regulate, forbear < tempus (gen. temporis), time, period, orig., a span < IE * tempos, a span < * temp , to pull < base * …   English World dictionary

  • temper — [n1] state of mind atmosphere, attitude, attribute, aura, character, climate, complexion, condition, constitution, disposition, drift, frame of mind, humor, individualism, individuality, leaning, makeup, mind, mood, nature, orientation, outlook,… …   New thesaurus

  • temper — ► NOUN 1) a person s state of mind in terms of their being angry or calm. 2) a tendency to become angry easily. 3) an angry state of mind. 4) the degree of hardness and elasticity in steel or other metal. ► VERB 1) improve the temper of (a metal) …   English terms dictionary

  • temper — vb *moderate, qualify Analogous words: *adjust, regulate, fix: mitigate, alleviate, lighten, assuage, allay, *relieve: mollify, *pacify, appease Antonyms: intensify temper n 1 * …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Temper — Tem per, v. i. 1. To accord; to agree; to act and think in conformity. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To have or get a proper or desired state or quality; to grow soft and pliable. [1913 Webster] I have him already tempering between my finger and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Temper — Temper. См. Отпуск. (Источник: «Металлы и сплавы. Справочник.» Под редакцией Ю.П. Солнцева; НПО Профессионал , НПО Мир и семья ; Санкт Петербург, 2003 г.) …   Словарь металлургических терминов

  • temper — index abate (lessen), adapt, adjust (regulate), allay, alleviate, alter, animus …   Law dictionary

  • temper — I UK [ˈtempə(r)] / US [ˈtempər] noun Word forms temper : singular temper plural tempers ** 1) [countable/uncountable] a tendency to get angry very quickly That temper of yours is going to get you into trouble. She should never have married a man… …   English dictionary

  • temper — tem|per1 [ tempər ] noun ** 1. ) count or uncount a tendency to get angry very quickly: That temper of yours is going to get you into trouble. She should never have married a man with such a violent temper. have a short temper (=become angry very …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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