Taint
Taint Taint, v. t. 1. To injure, as a lance, without breaking it; also, to break, as a lance, but usually in an unknightly or unscientific manner. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Do not fear; I have A staff to taint, and bravely. --Massinger. [1913 Webster]

2. To hit or touch lightly, in tilting. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

They tainted each other on the helms and passed by. --Ld. Berners. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Taint — may refer to: *Spoilage or contamination *Cork taint, as in wine *Taint checking, a feature in some programming languages *US English slang for the perineum *Taint (band), a sludge metal band from the UK *Taint (legal), in reference to evidence… …   Wikipedia

  • taint — / tānt/ vt: to damage or destroy the validity of evidence taint ed by an illegal search taint n Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • Taint — Taint, v. t. [F. teint, p. p. of teindre to dye, tinge, fr. L. tingere, tinctum. See {Tinge}, and cf. {Tint}.] 1. To imbue or impregnate with something extraneous, especially with something odious, noxious, or poisonous; hence, to corrupt; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Taint — Taint, n. [Cf. F. atteinte a blow, bit, stroke. See {Attaint}.] 1. A thrust with a lance, which fails of its intended effect. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] This taint he followed with his sword drawn from a silver sheath. Chapman. [1913 Webster] 2. An… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Taint — Taint, v. i. 1. To be infected or corrupted; to be touched with something corrupting. [1913 Webster] I can not taint with fear. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To be affected with incipient putrefaction; as, meat soon taints in warm weather. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Taint — Taint, n. 1. Tincture; hue; color; tinge. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. Infection; corruption; deprivation. [1913 Webster] He had inherited from his parents a scrofulous taint, which it was beyond the power of medicine to remove. Macaulay. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Taint — Taint, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Tainted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Tainting}.] To thrust ineffectually with a lance. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Taint — Taint, v. t. Aphetic form of {Attaint}. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • taint — [n] contamination, corruption black mark, blemish, blot, contagion, defect, disgrace, dishonor, fault, flaw, infection, pollution, shame, smear, spot, stain, stigma; concepts 230,388 Ant. cleanliness, perfection taint [v] dirty, contaminate; ruin …   New thesaurus

  • taint — (v.) 1570s, to corrupt, contaminate, also to trouch, tinge, imbue slightly (1590s), from M.E. teynten to convict, prove guilty (late 14c.), partly from O.Fr. ataint, pp. of ataindre to touch upon, seize (see ATTAINDER (Cf. attainder)). Also from… …   Etymology dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”