Tack
Tack Tack, n. [OE. tak, takke, a fastening; akin to D. tak a branch, twig, G. zacke a twig, prong, spike, Dan. takke a tack, spike; cf. also Sw. tagg prickle, point, Icel. t[=a]g a willow twig, Ir. taca a peg, nail, fastening, Gael. tacaid, Armor. & Corn. tach; perhaps akin to E. take. Cf. {Attach}, {Attack}, {Detach}, {Tag} an end, {Zigzag}.] 1. A small, short, sharp-pointed nail, usually having a broad, flat head. [1913 Webster]

2. That which is attached; a supplement; an appendix. See {Tack}, v. t., 3. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

Some tacks had been made to money bills in King Charles's time. --Bp. Burnet. [1913 Webster]

3. (Naut.) (a) A rope used to hold in place the foremost lower corners of the courses when the vessel is closehauled (see Illust. of {Ship}); also, a rope employed to pull the lower corner of a studding sail to the boom. (b) The part of a sail to which the tack is usually fastened; the foremost lower corner of fore-and-aft sails, as of schooners (see Illust. of {Sail}). (c) The direction of a vessel in regard to the trim of her sails; as, the starboard tack, or port tack; -- the former when she is closehauled with the wind on her starboard side; hence, the run of a vessel on one tack; also, a change of direction; as, to take a different tack; -- often used metaphorically. [1913 Webster]

4. (Scots Law) A contract by which the use of a thing is set, or let, for hire; a lease. --Burrill. [1913 Webster]

5. Confidence; reliance. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell. [1913 Webster]

{Tack of a flag} (Naut.), a line spliced into the eye at the foot of the hoist for securing the flag to the halyards.

{Tack pins} (Naut.), belaying pins; -- also called {jack pins}.

{To haul the tacks aboard} (Naut.), to set the courses.

{To hold tack}, to last or hold out. --Milton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • Tack — may refer to:* Tack , a type of cut nail, used in upholstery, shoe making and saddle manufacture * Horse tack, harness and equipment to allow horse back riding * Tack (sewing) (also baste or pin ), quick, temporary stitching intended to be… …   Wikipedia

  • Tack — ist der Name von Alfred Tack (1898–1970), deutscher Politiker (SPD) Anita Tack (* 1951), deutsche Politikerin (Die Linke) Conrad Tack (1844 1919), Unternehmer und Mitbegründer Conrad Tack u. Cie Fritz Tack (* 1942), deutscher Politiker (Die… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Tack — Tack, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tacked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Tacking}.] [Cf. OD. tacken to touch, take, seize, fix, akin to E. take. See {Tack} a small nail.] 1. To fasten or attach. In hopes of getting some commendam tacked to their sees. Swift. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tack — vt: to combine (a use, possession, or period of time) with that of another esp. in order to satisfy the statutory time period for acquiring title to or a prescriptive easement in the property of a third party successive adverse users in privity… …   Law dictionary

  • tack — Ⅰ. tack [1] ► NOUN 1) a small, sharp broad headed nail. 2) N. Amer. a drawing pin. 3) a long stitch used to fasten fabrics together temporarily. 4) a course of action. 5) Sailing an act of tacking. 6) …   English terms dictionary

  • Tack — Tack, v. i. (Naut.) To change the direction of a vessel by shifting the position of the helm and sails; also (as said of a vessel), to have her direction changed through the shifting of the helm and sails. See {Tack}, v. t., 4. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tack — [tak] n. [ME takke < MDu tacke, twig, point, akin to Ger zacke < ? IE base * dek , to tear > TAIL1] 1. a short nail or pin, with a narrow shaft that is not tapered and a relatively large, flat head 2. a) the act of fastening, esp. in a… …   English World dictionary

  • Tack — Tack, n. [From an old or dialectal form of F. tache. See {Techy}.] 1. A stain; a tache. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. [Cf. L. tactus.] A peculiar flavor or taint; as, a musty tack. [Obs. or Colloq.] Drayton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tack — [n1] course of movement aim, alteration, approach, bearing, bend, deflection, deviation, digression, direction, double, echelon, heading, line, method, oblique course, path, plan, point of sail, procedure, set, shift, siding, sidling, sweep,… …   New thesaurus

  • Tack — Nom porté en Belgique et dans le nord de la France. Son sens est incertain : on peut le rapprocher du picard taque (= tache) ou du flamand tak (= objet pointu). D autres solutions sont éventuellement envisageables …   Noms de famille

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