Tabernacle
Tabernacle Tab"er*na*cle, n. [F., fr. L. tabernaculum, dim. of taberna nut. See {Tabern}.] 1. A slightly built or temporary habitation; especially, a tent. [1913 Webster]

Dwelling in tabernacles with Isaac and Jacob. --Heb. xi. 9. [1913 Webster]

Orange trees planted in the ground, and secured in winter with a wooden tabernacle and stoves. --Evelyn. [1913 Webster]

2. (Jewish Antiq.) A portable structure of wooden framework covered with curtains, which was carried through the wilderness in the Israelitish exodus, as a place of sacrifice and worship. --Ex. xxvi. [1913 Webster]

3. Hence, the Jewish temple; sometimes, any other place for worship. --Acts xv. 16. [1913 Webster]

4. Figuratively: The human body, as the temporary abode of the soul. [1913 Webster]

Shortly I must put off this my tabernacle. --2 Pet. i. 14. [1913 Webster]

5. Any small cell, or like place, in which some holy or precious things was deposited or kept. Specifically: [1913 Webster] (a) The ornamental receptacle for the pyx, or for the consecrated elements, whether a part of a building or movable. [1913 Webster] (b) A niche for the image of a saint, or for any sacred painting or sculpture. [1913 Webster] (c) Hence, a work of art of sacred subject, having a partially architectural character, as a solid frame resting on a bracket, or the like. [1913 Webster] (d) A tryptich for sacred imagery. [1913 Webster] (e) A seat or stall in a choir, with its canopy. [1913 Webster]

6. (Naut.) A boxlike step for a mast with the after side open, so that the mast can be lowered to pass under bridges, etc. [1913 Webster]

{Feast of Tabernacles} (Jewish Antiq.), one of the three principal festivals of the Jews, lasting seven days, during which the people dwelt in booths formed of the boughs of trees, in commemoration of the habitation of their ancestors in similar dwellings during their pilgrimage in the wilderness.

{Tabernacle work}, rich canopy work like that over the head of niches, used over seats or stalls, or over sepulchral monuments. --Oxf. Gloss. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • TABERNACLE — (Lat. tabernaculum, tent ; taberna, hut ; the word renders the Heb. mishkan), the portable sanctuary constructed by the Children of Israel in the wilderness at the command of God. (The word has no connection with the Festival of Tabernacles –… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Tabernacle — • Vessel holding the Blessed Sacrament • Old Testament precursor to the Temple Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Tabernacle     ♦ …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • tabernacle — [ tabɛrnakl ] n. m. • 1120; lat. tabernaculum « tente » 1 ♦ Relig. Tente des Juifs de l Antiquité. Fête des tabernacles, célébrée après la moisson sous des abris de feuillage (fête appelée par les juifs fête des Cabanes, des Tentes). Spécialt… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • tabernacle — TABERNACLE. s. m. Tente, pavillon. En ce sens il n a d usage qu en parlant des tentes, des pavillons des Israëlites. Retourne, Israël, dans tes tabernacles. la feste des tabernacles. l Ecriture marque que saint Pierre à la Transfiguration de N. S …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • tabernacle — [tab′ər nak΄əl] n. [ME < LL(Ec) tabernaculum, the Jewish tabernacle (transl. of Heb ohel in ohel moed, tent of meeting) < L, tent, dim. of taberna, hut, shed, TAVERN] 1. Archaic a) a temporary shelter, as a tent b) a dwelling place 2. the… …   English World dictionary

  • tabernacle — (n.) mid 13c., portable sanctuary carried by the Israelites in the wilderness, from O.Fr. tabernacle (12c.), from L. tabernaculum tent, especially a tent of an augur (for taking observations), dim. of taberna hut, cabin, booth (see TAVERN (Cf.… …   Etymology dictionary

  • tabernacle — Tabernacle, Et pavillon, Tabernaculum. Le tabernacle de nostre corps, ou l esprit est logé, Custodia corporis …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • Tabernacle — Tab er*na*cle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Tabernacled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Tabernacling}.] To dwell or reside for a time; to be temporary housed. [1913 Webster] He assumed our nature, and tabernacled among us in the flesh. Dr. J. Scott. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tabernacle — index domicile, dwelling, habitation (dwelling place) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • tabernacle — ► NOUN 1) (in the Bible) a tent used as a sanctuary for the Ark of the Covenant by the Israelites during the Exodus. 2) a receptacle or cabinet in which a pyx containing the reserved sacrament may be placed in Catholic churches. 3) a meeting… …   English terms dictionary

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