acknowledge ac*knowl"edge ([a^]k*n[o^]l"[e^]j), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {acknowledged} ([a^]k*n[o^]l"[e^]jd); p. pr. & vb. n. {acknowledging} ([a^]k*n[o^]l"[e^]j*[i^]ng).] [Prob. fr. pref. a- + the verb knowledge. See {Knowledge}, and cf. {Acknow}.] 1. To own or admit the knowledge of; to recognize as a fact or truth; to declare one's belief in; as, to acknowledge the being of a God. [1913 Webster]

I acknowledge my transgressions. --Ps. li. 3. [1913 Webster]

For ends generally acknowledged to be good. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

2. To own or recognize in a particular character or relationship; to admit the claims or authority of; to give recognition to. [1913 Webster]

In all thy ways acknowledge Him. --Prov. iii. 6. [1913 Webster]

By my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To own with gratitude or as a benefit or an obligation; as, to acknowledge a favor, the receipt of a letter. [1913 Webster]

They his gifts acknowledged none. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

4. To own as genuine; to assent to, as a legal instrument, to give it validity; to avow or admit in legal form; as, to acknowledge a deed. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To avow; proclaim; recognize; own; admit; allow; concede; confess.

Usage: {Acknowledge}, {Recognize}. Acknowledge is opposed to keep back, or conceal, and supposes that something had been previously known to us (though perhaps not to others) which we now feel bound to lay open or make public. Thus, a man acknowledges a secret marriage; one who has done wrong acknowledges his fault; and author acknowledges his obligation to those who have aided him; we acknowledge our ignorance. Recognize supposes that we have either forgotten or not had the evidence of a thing distinctly before our minds, but that now we know it (as it were) anew, or receive and admit in on the ground of the evidence it brings. Thus, we recognize a friend after a long absence. We recognize facts, principles, truths, etc., when their evidence is brought up fresh to the mind; as, bad men usually recognize the providence of God in seasons of danger. A foreign minister, consul, or agent, of any kind, is recognized on the ground of his producing satisfactory credentials. See also {Confess}. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

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  • acknowledge */*/ — UK [əkˈnɒlɪdʒ] / US [əkˈnɑlɪdʒ] verb [transitive] Word forms acknowledge : present tense I/you/we/they acknowledge he/she/it acknowledges present participle acknowledging past tense acknowledged past participle acknowledged 1) a) to accept or… …   English dictionary

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  • acknowledge — acknowledgeable, adj. acknowledger, n. /ak nol ij/, v.t., acknowledged, acknowledging. 1. to admit to be real or true; recognize the existence, truth, or fact of: to acknowledge one s mistakes. 2. to show or express recognition or realization of …   Universalium

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