Swingeing
Swinge Swinge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Swinged} (sw[i^]njd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Swingeing} (sw[i^]nj"[i^]ng).] [OE. swengen, AS. swengan to shake, causative of swingan. See {Swing}.] 1. To beat soundly; to whip; to chastise; to punish. [1913 Webster]

I had swinged him soundly. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

And swinges his own vices in his son. --C. Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To move as a lash; to lash. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Swinges the scaly horror of his folded tail. --Milton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • swingeing — UK US /ˈswɪndʒɪŋ/ adjective UK FORMAL ► extreme and having a serious and unpleasant effect: »The government is expected to make swingeing cuts …   Financial and business terms

  • swingeing — [swin′jiŋ] adj. [prp. of SWINGE: cf. STRAPPING] Brit. 1. forceful, often in a negative way; severe [a swingeing attack] 2. Now Rare huge; very large …   English World dictionary

  • Swingeing — Swinge ing, a. Huge; very large. [Colloq.] Arbuthnot. Byron. {Swinge ing*ly}, adv. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • swingeing — ► ADJECTIVE chiefly Brit. ▪ severe or otherwise extreme. ORIGIN from archaic swinge «strike hard», from Old English, shake, shatter …   English terms dictionary

  • swingeing — swinge|ing [ˈswındʒıŋ] adj BrE written [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: swinge to punish severely (16 19 centuries)] 1.) extremely severe and likely to cause people financial problems ▪ swingeing cuts in staff numbers ▪ swingeing price increases ▪… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • swingeing — [[t]swɪ̱nʤɪŋ[/t]] ADJ: ADJ n A swingeing action, such as an attack or cut, is very great or severe. [BRIT, mainly JOURNALISM] ...the book mounted a swingeing attack on the materialist, growth oriented economics of the day... There have been… …   English dictionary

  • swingeing — swinging, swingeing Swinging is the ordinary present participle of the verb swing, whereas swingeing means ‘forcible, severe’ (as in swingeing tax increases), and is part of an archaic verb swinge meaning ‘to strike hard’ …   Modern English usage

  • swingeing — I. adjective also swinging Etymology: from present participle of 1swinge Date: 1575 chiefly British very large, high, or severe < swingeing fines > < swingeing taxes > II. adverb or …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • swingeing — swinge|ing [ swındʒıŋ ] adjective BRITISH 1. ) large and likely to cause serious difficulty or harm: swingeing cuts in public services 2. ) criticizing someone or something very severely: swingeing attacks/comments …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • swingeing — adjective BrE swingeing cuts very severe reductions in spending, especially by a government or organization; sweeping (1): swingeing cuts in public spending …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • swingeing — UK [ˈswɪndʒɪŋ] / US adjective British 1) large and likely to cause serious difficulty or harm swingeing cuts in public services 2) criticizing someone or something very severely swingeing attacks/comments …   English dictionary

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