Betroth Be*troth", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Betrothed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Betrothing}.] [Pref. be- + troth, i. e., truth. See {Truth}.] 1. To contract to any one for a marriage; to engage or promise in order to marriage; to affiance; -- used esp. of a woman. [1913 Webster]

He, in the first flower of my freshest age, Betrothed me unto the only heir. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Ay, and we are betrothed. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To promise to take (as a future spouse); to plight one's troth to. [1913 Webster]

What man is there that hath betrothed a wife, and hath not taken her? --Deut. xx. 7. [1913 Webster]

3. To nominate to a bishopric, in order to consecration. --Ayliffe. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • betroth — [bē trōth′, bētrôth′; bitrōth′, bitrôth′] vt. [ME bitrouthen < be , BE + treuthe < OE treowth, truth] 1. Obs. to promise to marry 2. to promise in marriage [to betroth a daughter] …   English World dictionary

  • betroth — (v.) c.1300, betrouthen, from bi , here probably with a sense of thoroughly, + M.E. treowðe truth, from O.E. treowðe truth, a pledge (see TROTH (Cf. troth)). Related: BETROTHED (Cf. Betrothed); betrothing …   Etymology dictionary

  • betroth — [v] marry affiance, become engaged, bind, commit, contract, engage, espouse, give one’s hand, make compact, plight faith, plight troth, promise, tie oneself to, vow; concept 297 Ant. divorce, leave, separate …   New thesaurus

  • betroth — transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from be + trouthe truth, troth Date: 14th century 1. to promise to marry 2. to give in marriage …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • betroth — /bi trohdh , trawth /, v.t. 1. to arrange for the marriage of; affiance (usually used in passive constructions): The couple was betrothed with the approval of both families. 2. Archaic. to promise to marry. [1275 1325; ME betrouthe, var. of… …   Universalium

  • betroth — verb /bəˈtroʊð,bəˈtrɔθ/ To promise to give in marriage. He betrothed his daughter to a distant relative. See Also: affiance, fiancé, fiancée, plight, troth, marriage …   Wiktionary

  • Betroth —    To promise by one s truth. Men and women were betrothed when they were engaged to be married. This usually took place a year or more before marriage. From the time of betrothal the woman was regarded as the lawful wife of the man to whom she… …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • betroth — v. (rare) (B) they were betrothed to each other at an early age * * * [bɪ trəʊð] (rare) (B) they were betrothed to each other at an early age …   Combinatory dictionary

  • betroth — (Roget s IV) v. Syn. publish the banns, become engaged, bestow one s hand, give one s hand, contract, pledge, promise, precontract, plight faith, plight troth, bind, engage, affiance, commit oneself to, undertake to marry, espouse …   English dictionary for students

  • betroth — see TRUE …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”