Swagging
Swag Swag, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Swagged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Swagging}.] [Cf. Icel. sveggja, sveigja to bend, to sway, Norw. svaga to sway. See {Sway}.] 1. To hang or move, as something loose and heavy; to sway; to swing. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster]

2. To sink down by its weight; to sag. --Sir H. Wotton. [1913 Webster]

I swag as a fat person's belly swaggeth as he goeth. --Palsgrave. [1913 Webster]

3. To tramp carrying a swag. [Australia] [Webster 1913 Suppl.]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • swagging — swæg n. decorative curtain or other hanging draped in a curve from two points; loot, stolen goods (Slang); swagman s pack or bundle containing personal belongings (Australian) v. walk unsteadily, sway; droop, sag; travel around carrying one s… …   English contemporary dictionary

  • swagging — present part of swag …   Useful english dictionary

  • swag — swag1 /swag/, n., v., swagged, swagging. n. 1. a suspended wreath, garland, drapery, or the like, fastened up at or near each end and hanging down in the middle; festoon. 2. a wreath, spray, or cluster of foliage, flowers, or fruit. 3. a festoon …   Universalium

  • Swag — Swag, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Swagged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Swagging}.] [Cf. Icel. sveggja, sveigja to bend, to sway, Norw. svaga to sway. See {Sway}.] 1. To hang or move, as something loose and heavy; to sway; to swing. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] 2.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Swagged — Swag Swag, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Swagged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Swagging}.] [Cf. Icel. sveggja, sveigja to bend, to sway, Norw. svaga to sway. See {Sway}.] 1. To hang or move, as something loose and heavy; to sway; to swing. [Prov. Eng.] [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wallet — Wal let, n. [OE. walet, probably the same word as OE. watel a bag. See {Wattle}.] 1. A bag or sack for carrying about the person, as a bag for carrying the necessaries for a journey; a knapsack; a beggar s receptacle for charity; a peddler s pack …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • swag — I. verb (swagged; swagging) Etymology: perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Norwegian svagga to sway, rock; akin to Middle Low German swacken to rock Date: 1530 intransitive verb 1. sway, lurch 2. sag, droop …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • swag — noun 1》 an ornamental festoon of flowers, fruit, and greenery.     ↘a curtain or drape fastened to hang in a drooping curve. 2》 informal money or goods taken by a thief or burglar. 3》 Austral./NZ a traveller s or miner s bundle of personal… …   English new terms dictionary

  • itinerancy — n wandering, roaming, roving, rambling, wayfaring, drifting, gallivanting, gad, gadding, Dial. traipsing, Australian. swagging, Australian. waltzing matilda, Sl. bumming; nomadism, peripateticism, vagabondism, hoboism, vagrancy; wanderlust, Sl.… …   A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • swag — /swæg / (say swag) noun 1. a bundle or roll carried across the shoulders or otherwise, and containing the bedding and personal belongings of a traveller through the bush, a miner, etc.; shiralee; bluey; drum: *I got my rug and rolled it up into a …   Australian English dictionary

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