Support arms
Support Sup*port", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Supported}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Supporting}.] [F. supporter, L. supportare to carry on, to convey, in LL., to support, sustain; sub under + portare to carry. See {Port} demeanor.] 1. To bear by being under; to keep from falling; to uphold; to sustain, in a literal or physical sense; to prop up; to bear the weight of; as, a pillar supports a structure; an abutment supports an arch; the trunk of a tree supports the branches. [1913 Webster]

2. To endure without being overcome, exhausted, or changed in character; to sustain; as, to support pain, distress, or misfortunes. [1913 Webster]

This fierce demeanor and his insolence The patience of a god could not support. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

3. To keep from failing or sinking; to solace under affictive circumstances; to assist; to encourage; to defend; as, to support the courage or spirits. [1913 Webster]

4. To assume and carry successfully, as the part of an actor; to represent or act; to sustain; as, to support the character of King Lear. [1913 Webster]

5. To furnish with the means of sustenance or livelihood; to maintain; to provide for; as, to support a family; to support the ministers of the gospel. [1913 Webster]

6. To carry on; to enable to continue; to maintain; as, to support a war or a contest; to support an argument or a debate. [1913 Webster]

7. To verify; to make good; to substantiate; to establish; to sustain; as, the testimony is not sufficient to support the charges; the evidence will not support the statements or allegations. [1913 Webster]

To urge such arguments, as though they were sufficient to support and demonstrate a whole scheme of moral philosophy. --J. Edwards. [1913 Webster]

8. To vindicate; to maintain; to defend successfully; as, to be able to support one's own cause. [1913 Webster]

9. To uphold by aid or countenance; to aid; to help; to back up; as, to support a friend or a party; to support the present administration. [1913 Webster]

Wherefore, bold pleasant, Darest thou support a published traitor? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

10. A attend as an honorary assistant; as, a chairman supported by a vice chairman; O'Connell left the prison, supported by his two sons. [1913 Webster]

{Support arms} (Mil.), a command in the manual of arms in responce to which the piece is held vertically at the shoulder, with the hammer resting on the left forearm, which is passed horizontally across the body in front; also, the position assumed in response to this command. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To maintain; endure; verify; substantiate; countenance; patronize; help; back; second; succor; relieve; uphold; encourage; favor; nurture; nourish; cherish; shield; defend; protect; stay; assist; forward. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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