Supervene Su`per*vene", v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Supervened}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Supervening}.] [L. supervenire, superventum, to come over, to come upon; super over + venire to come. See {Super-}, and {Come}, and cf. {Overcome}.] To come as something additional or extraneous; to occur with reference or relation to something else; to happen upon or after something else; to be added; to take place; to happen. [1913 Webster]

Such a mutual gravitation can never supervene to matter unless impressed by divine power. --Bentley. [1913 Webster]

A tyrany immediately supervened. --Burke. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • supervening — Unforeseen, intervening, an additional event or cause. Dictionary from West s Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005. supervening Unforeseen, intervening, an additional event or cause …   Law dictionary

  • Supervening — supervenience …   Philosophy dictionary

  • supervening — su·per·vene || ‚suːpÉ™(r) vɪːn v. occur as something additional; occur after, follow, ensue …   English contemporary dictionary

  • supervening — …   Useful english dictionary

  • supervening cause — see cause 1 Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. supervening cause n …   Law dictionary

  • supervening negligence — To come within the doctrine of last clear chance or supervening negligence, four conditions must coexist, to wit: (1) the injured party has already come into a position of peril; (2) the injuring party then or thereafter becomes, or in the… …   Black's law dictionary

  • supervening cause — A new effective cause which, operating independently of anything else, becomes proximate cause of accident. See also intervening cause superseding cause …   Black's law dictionary

  • supervening cause — See intervening cause …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • supervening negligence — See intervening cause; last clear chance …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • South African contract law — is essentially a modernised version of the Roman Dutch law of contract, [1] which is itself rooted in Roman law. In the broadest definition, a contract is an agreement entered into by two or more parties with the serious intention of creating a… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”