Superfluities
Superfluity Su`per*flu"i*ty, n.; pl. {Superfluities}. [L. superfluit['e], L. superfluitas. See {Superfluous}.] 1. A greater quantity than is wanted; superabundance; as, a superfluity of water; a superfluity of wealth. [1913 Webster]

A quiet mediocrity is still to be preferred before a troubled superfluity. --Suckling. [1913 Webster]

2. The state or quality of being superfluous; excess. ``By a superfluity abominable.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

3. Something beyond what is needed; something which serves for show or luxury. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Superabundance; excess; redundancy. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • superfluities — superfluous ► ADJECTIVE ▪ unnecessary, especially through being more than enough. DERIVATIVES superfluity noun (pl. superfluities) superfluously adverb. ORIGIN Latin superfluus, from fluere to flow …   English terms dictionary

  • superfluities — su·per·flu·i·ty || ‚suːpÉ™(r) flÊŠÉ™tɪ n. state or quality of being superfluous; overabundance; something which is unnecessary …   English contemporary dictionary

  • superfluities do not prejudice — Surplusage does not vitiate …   Black's law dictionary

  • Rousseau (Jean-Jacques) and Burke — Jean Jacques Rousseau and Burke Ian Harris Those who thought about the social and political order directed their attention to a new centre of interest towards the end of the seventeenth century. It was not that speculation about political… …   History of philosophy

  • prune — 1. n. 1 a dried plum. 2 colloq. a silly or disliked person. Etymology: ME f. OF ult. f. L prunum f. Gk prou(m)non plum 2. v.tr. 1 a (often foll. by down) trim (a tree etc.) by cutting away dead or overgrown branches etc. b (usu. foll. by off,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Retrench — Re*trench , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Retrenched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Retrenching}.] [OF. retrenchier, F. retrancher; pref. re re + OF. trenchier, F. trancher, to cut. See {Trench}.] 1. To cut off; to pare away. [1913 Webster] Thy exuberant parts… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Retrenched — Retrench Re*trench , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Retrenched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Retrenching}.] [OF. retrenchier, F. retrancher; pref. re re + OF. trenchier, F. trancher, to cut. See {Trench}.] 1. To cut off; to pare away. [1913 Webster] Thy exuberant… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Retrenching — Retrench Re*trench , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Retrenched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Retrenching}.] [OF. retrenchier, F. retrancher; pref. re re + OF. trenchier, F. trancher, to cut. See {Trench}.] 1. To cut off; to pare away. [1913 Webster] Thy exuberant… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Superfluity — Su per*flu i*ty, n.; pl. {Superfluities}. [L. superfluit[ e], L. superfluitas. See {Superfluous}.] 1. A greater quantity than is wanted; superabundance; as, a superfluity of water; a superfluity of wealth. [1913 Webster] A quiet mediocrity is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Want — (277), n. [Originally an adj., from Icel. vant, neuter of vanr lacking, deficient. [root]139. See {Wane}, v. i.] [1913 Webster] 1. The state of not having; the condition of being without anything; absence or scarcity of what is needed or desired; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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