Sucking
Suck Suck (s[u^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sucked} (s[u^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Sucking}.] [OE. suken, souken, AS. s[=u]can, s[=u]gan; akin to D. zuigen, G. saugen, OHG. s[=u]gan, Icel. s[=u]ga, sj[=u]ga, Sw. suga, Dan. suge, L. sugere. Cf. {Honeysuckle}, {Soak}, {Succulent}, {Suction}.] 1. To draw, as a liquid, by the action of the mouth and tongue, which tends to produce a vacuum, and causes the liquid to rush in by atmospheric pressure; to draw, or apply force to, by exhausting the air. [1913 Webster]

2. To draw liquid from by the action of the mouth; as, to suck an orange; specifically, to draw milk from (the mother, the breast, etc.) with the mouth; as, the young of an animal sucks the mother, or dam; an infant sucks the breast. [1913 Webster]

3. To draw in, or imbibe, by any process resembles sucking; to inhale; to absorb; as, to suck in air; the roots of plants suck water from the ground. [1913 Webster]

4. To draw or drain. [1913 Webster]

Old ocean, sucked through the porous globe. --Thomson. [1913 Webster]

5. To draw in, as a whirlpool; to swallow up. [1913 Webster]

As waters are by whirlpools sucked and drawn. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

{To suck in}, to draw into the mouth; to imbibe; to absorb.

{To suck out}, to draw out with the mouth; to empty by suction.

{To suck up}, to draw into the mouth; to draw up by suction or absorption. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sucking — Suck ing, a. Drawing milk from the mother or dam; hence, colloquially, young, inexperienced, as, a sucking infant; a sucking calf. [1913 Webster] I suppose you are a young barrister, sucking lawyer, or that sort of thing. Thackeray. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sucking — adj. 1 (of a child, animal, etc.) not yet weaned. 2 Zool. unfledged (sucking dove). Phrases and idioms: sucking disc an organ used for adhering to a surface. sucking fish = REMORA …   Useful english dictionary

  • sucking — sÊŒk n. act of sucking; sound produced by sucking; something that is is sucked v. draw into the mouth using the lips and tongue; draw in, pull in; place in the mouth and draw upon; cause to dissolve in the mouth; be repulsive or disgusting… …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Sucking —    A common method of healing illnesses employed by shamans while performing their duties as doctors. It is commonly understood that illness results from the intrusion of projectiles shot or forced into patient’s bodies by witches, sorcerers, or… …   Historical dictionary of shamanism

  • sucking — adjective Date: before 12th century not yet weaned; broadly very young …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • sucking — /suk ing/, adj. 1. not weaned. 2. very young. [bef. 1000; ME souking(e), OE sucende; see SUCK, ING2] * * *       drawing of fluids into the mouth by creating a vacuum pressure in the oral cavity. Mammalian infants rely on this method of food… …   Universalium

  • sucking — adjective (of a child or animal) not yet weaned …   English new terms dictionary

  • Sucking bottle — Sucking Suck ing, a. Drawing milk from the mother or dam; hence, colloquially, young, inexperienced, as, a sucking infant; a sucking calf. [1913 Webster] I suppose you are a young barrister, sucking lawyer, or that sort of thing. Thackeray. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sucking fish — Sucking Suck ing, a. Drawing milk from the mother or dam; hence, colloquially, young, inexperienced, as, a sucking infant; a sucking calf. [1913 Webster] I suppose you are a young barrister, sucking lawyer, or that sort of thing. Thackeray. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sucking pump — Sucking Suck ing, a. Drawing milk from the mother or dam; hence, colloquially, young, inexperienced, as, a sucking infant; a sucking calf. [1913 Webster] I suppose you are a young barrister, sucking lawyer, or that sort of thing. Thackeray. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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