Succeed Suc*ceed", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Succeeded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Succeeding}.] [L. succedere, successum; sub under + cedere to go, to go along, approach, follow, succeed: cf. F. succ['e]der. See {Cede}, and cf. {Success}.] 1. To follow in order; to come next after; hence, to take the place of; as, the king's eldest son succeeds his father on the throne; autumn succeeds summer. [1913 Webster]

As he saw him nigh succeed. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

2. To fall heir to; to inherit. [Obs. & R.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To come after; to be subsequent or consequent to; to follow; to pursue. [1913 Webster]

Destructive effects . . . succeeded the curse. --Sir T. Browne. [1913 Webster]

4. To support; to prosper; to promote. [R.] [1913 Webster]

Succeed my wish and second my design. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • succeed — UK US /səkˈsiːd/ verb ► [I] if you succeed, you achieve something that you have been trying to do or get, and if a plan or a piece of work succeeds, it has the results that you wanted: succeed in sth »He is determined to succeed in the property… …   Financial and business terms

  • Succeed — Suc*ceed , v. i. 1. To come in the place of another person, thing, or event; to come next in the usual, natural, or prescribed course of things; to follow; hence, to come next in the possession of anything; often with to. [1913 Webster] If the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • succeed — suc·ceed /sək sēd/ vi 1: to come next after another in office or position 2 a: to take something by succession succeed ed to his mother s estate b: to acquire the rights, obligations, and charges of a decedent in property comprising an estate …   Law dictionary

  • succeed — 1 *follow, ensue, supervene Analogous words: displace, supplant, replace, supersede Antonyms: precede 2 Succeed, prosper, thrive, flourish can mean to attain or to be attaining a desired end. Succeed (see also FOLLOW) implies little more than… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • succeed — [sək sēd′] vi. [ME succeden < L succedere, to go beneath or under, follow after < sub , under + cedere, to go: see CEDE] 1. a) to come next after another; follow; ensue b) to follow another into office, possession, etc., as by election,… …   English World dictionary

  • succeed — late 14c., come next after, take the place of another, from O.Fr. succeder (14c.), from L. succedere come after, go near to, from sub next to, after + cedere go, move (see CEDE (Cf. cede)). Meaning to continue, endure is from early 15c. The sense …   Etymology dictionary

  • succeed — When it means ‘to be successful’, succeed is followed by in + an ing form, not (unlike fail) by to: • Some local preservation enthusiasts succeeded in getting the house listed as of architectural and historic interest E. Lemarchand, 1972 …   Modern English usage

  • succeed — [v1] attain good outcome accomplish, achieve, acquire, arrive, avail, benefit, be successful, carry off*, come off*, conquer, distance, do all right*, do the trick*, earn, flourish, fulfill, gain, get, get to the top*, grow famous, hit*, make a… …   New thesaurus

  • succeed — ► VERB 1) achieve an aim or purpose. 2) attain fame, wealth, or social status. 3) take over an office, title, etc., from (someone). 4) become the new rightful holder of an office, title, etc. 5) come after and take the place of. ORIGIN Latin… …   English terms dictionary

  • succeed — suc|ceed W2S3 [səkˈsi:d] v [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: succedere to go up, follow after, succeed , from sub near + cedere to go ] 1.) to do what you tried or wanted to do ▪ She wanted to be the first woman to climb Mount Everest, and she… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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