Subjunctive
Subjunctive Sub*junc"tive, a. [L. subjunctivus, fr. subjungere, subjunctum, to subjoin: cf. F. subjonctif. See {Subjoin}.] Subjoined or added to something before said or written. [1913 Webster]

{Subjunctive mood} (Gram.), that form of a verb which express the action or state not as a fact, but only as a conception of the mind still contingent and dependent. It is commonly subjoined, or added as subordinate, to some other verb, and in English is often connected with it by if, that, though, lest, unless, except, until, etc., as in the following sentence: ``If there were no honey, they [bees] would have no object in visiting the flower.'' --Lubbock. In some languages, as in Latin and Greek, the subjunctive is often independent of any other verb, being used in wishes, commands, exhortations, etc. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Subjunctive — Sub*junc tive, n. (Gram.) The subjunctive mood; also, a verb in the subjunctive mood. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • subjunctive — 1520s, mood employed to denote an action or state as conceived and not as a fact, from L.L. subjunctivus serving to join, connecting, from pp. stem of subjungere to append, add at the end, place under, from sub under (see SUB (Cf. sub )) +… …   Etymology dictionary

  • subjunctive — Grammar ► ADJECTIVE ▪ (of a form of a verb) expressing what is imagined or wished or possible. ► NOUN ▪ a verb in the subjunctive mood. ORIGIN Latin subjunctivus, from subjungere add to, join in addition …   English terms dictionary

  • subjunctive — [səb juŋk′tiv] adj. [LL subjunctivus < L subjunctus, pp. of subjungere, to SUBJOIN] Gram. designating or of the mood of a verb that is used to express supposition, desire, hypothesis, possibility, etc., rather than to state an actual fact (Ex …   English World dictionary

  • subjunctive — subjunctively, adv. /seuhb jungk tiv/, Gram. adj. 1. (in English and certain other languages) noting or pertaining to a mood or mode of the verb that may be used for subjective, doubtful, hypothetical, or grammatically subordinate statements or… …   Universalium

  • subjunctive — sub•junc•tive [[t]səbˈdʒʌŋk tɪv[/t]] adj. 1) gram. of or designating a grammatical mood typically used for subjective, doubtful, hypothetical, or grammatically subordinate statements or questions, as the mood of be in if this be treason Compare… …   From formal English to slang

  • subjunctive — I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin subjunctivus, from Latin subjunctus, past participle of subjungere to join beneath, subordinate Date: 1530 of, relating to, or constituting a verb form or set of verb forms that represents a denoted act or state …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • subjunctive — /səbˈdʒʌŋktɪv / (say suhb jungktiv) Grammar –adjective 1. (in many languages) designating or relating to a verb mood having among its functions the expression of contingent or hypothetical action. For example, in the sentence Were I but king,… …   Australian English dictionary

  • subjunctive — 1. adjective inflected to indicate that an act or state of being is possible, contingent or hypothetical, and not a fact. English examples include so be it; I wouldn’t if I were you; were I a younger man, I would fight back; I asked that he leave …   Wiktionary

  • subjunctive — sub|junc|tive [səbˈdʒʌŋktıv] n [Date: 1500 1600; : Late Latin; Origin: subjunctivus, from Latin subjunctus, past participle of subjungere to join below, subordinate ] a verb form or a set of verb forms in grammar, used in some languages to… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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