Subduct
Subduce Sub*duce", Subduct Sub*duct", v. t. [L. subducere, subductum; sub under + ducere to lead, to draw. See {Duke}, and cf. {Subdue}.] 1. To withdraw; to take away. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To subtract by arithmetical operation; to deduct. [1913 Webster]

If, out of that infinite multitude of antecedent generations, we should subduce ten. --Sir M. Hale. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • subduct — index decrease, deduct (reduce), discount (reduce), except (exclude), excise (cut away), retrench …   Law dictionary

  • subduct — /səbˈdʌkt/ (say suhb dukt) –verb (i) 1. Geology (of a tectonic plate) to slide beneath an adjacent, less dense, plate: the Australian plate subducts beneath the Eurasian plate. –verb (t) 2. Geology (of a tectonic plate) to slide beneath (an… …   Australian English dictionary

  • subduct — verb see subduction …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • subduct — /seuhb dukt /, v.t. 1. to take away; subtract. 2. to withdraw; remove. [1565 75; < L subductus, ptp. of subducere to draw up, withdraw (sub SUB + ducere to lead), equiv. to subduc ptp. s. + tus ptp. suffix] * * * …   Universalium

  • subduct — verb a) To push under or below. b) To move downwards underneath something. See Also: subduction …   Wiktionary

  • subduct — sub·duct (səb duktґ) [L. subducere to lead down] to depress or draw down; see subduction …   Medical dictionary

  • subduct — v. withdraw, take away …   English contemporary dictionary

  • subduct — v. a. See subduce …   New dictionary of synonyms

  • subduct — sub·duct …   English syllables

  • subduct — sub•duct [[t]səbˈdʌkt[/t]] v. t. 1) to cause the subduction of 2) archaic to take away 3) to undergo subduction • Etymology: 1565–75; < L subductus, ptp. of subdūcere to draw up, withdraw =sub sub +dūcere to lead …   From formal English to slang

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”