Stroke
Stroke Stroke, n. [OE. strok, strook, strak, fr. striken. See {Strike}, v. t.] 1. The act of striking; a blow; a hit; a knock; esp., a violent or hostile attack made with the arm or hand, or with an instrument or weapon. [1913 Webster]

His hand fetcheth a stroke with the ax to cut down the tree. --Deut. xix. 5. [1913 Webster]

A fool's lips enter into contention and his mouth calleth for strokes. --Prov. xviii. 6. [1913 Webster]

He entered and won the whole kingdom of Naples without striking a stroke. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

2. The result of effect of a striking; injury or affliction; soreness. [1913 Webster]

In the day that Lord bindeth up the breach of his people, and healeth the stroke of their wound. --Isa. xxx. 26. [1913 Webster]

3. The striking of the clock to tell the hour. [1913 Webster]

Well, but what's o'clock? - Upon the stroke of ten. -- Well, let is strike. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. A gentle, caressing touch or movement upon something; a stroking. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

5. A mark or dash in writing or printing; a line; the touch of a pen or pencil; as, an up stroke; a firm stroke. [1913 Webster]

O, lasting as those colors may they shine, Free as thy stroke, yet faultless as thy line. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

6. Hence, by extension, an addition or amandment to a written composition; a touch; as, to give some finishing strokes to an essay. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

7. A sudden attack of disease; especially, a fatal attack; a severe disaster; any affliction or calamity, especially a sudden one; as, a stroke of apoplexy; the stroke of death. [1913 Webster]

At this one stroke the man looked dead in law. --Harte. [1913 Webster]

8. A throb or beat, as of the heart. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

9. One of a series of beats or movements against a resisting medium, by means of which movement through or upon it is accomplished; as, the stroke of a bird's wing in flying, or an oar in rowing, of a skater, swimmer, etc.; also: (Rowing) (a) The rate of succession of stroke; as, a quick stroke. (b) The oar nearest the stern of a boat, by which the other oars are guided; -- called also {stroke oar}. (c) The rower who pulls the stroke oar; the strokesman. [1913 Webster]

10. A powerful or sudden effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished; also, something done or accomplished by such an effort; as, a stroke of genius; a stroke of business; a master stroke of policy. [1913 Webster]

11. (Mach.) The movement, in either direction, of the piston plunger, piston rod, crosshead, etc., as of a steam engine or a pump, in which these parts have a reciprocating motion; as, the forward stroke of a piston; also, the entire distance passed through, as by a piston, in such a movement; as, the piston is at half stroke. [1913 Webster]

Note: The respective strokes are distinguished as up and down strokes, outward and inward strokes, forward and back strokes, the forward stroke in stationary steam engines being toward the crosshead, but in locomotives toward the front of the vehicle. [1913 Webster]

12. Power; influence. [Obs.] ``Where money beareth [hath] all the stroke.'' --Robynson (More's Utopia). [1913 Webster]

He has a great stroke with the reader. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

13. Appetite. [Obs.] --Swift. [1913 Webster]

{To keep stroke}, to make strokes in unison. [1913 Webster]

The oars where silver, Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • stroke — ► NOUN 1) an act of hitting. 2) Golf an act of hitting the ball with a club, as a unit of scoring. 3) a sound made by a striking clock. 4) an act of stroking with the hand. 5) a mark made by drawing a pen, pencil, or paintbrush once across paper… …   English terms dictionary

  • stroke — [strōk] n. [ME, akin to Ger streich, a stroke, OE strican: see STRIKE] 1. a striking of one thing against another; blow or impact of an ax, whip, etc. 2. a) a sudden action resulting in a powerful or destructive effect, as if from a blow [a… …   English World dictionary

  • Stroke — Stroke, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Strokeed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Strokeing}.] [OE. stroken, straken, AS. str[=a]cian, fr. str[=i]can to go over, pass. See {Strike}, v. t., and cf. {Straggle}.] 1. To strike. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Ye mote with the plat… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • stroke — s.n. (Canotaj) Numărul de lovituri de vâslă pe minut; ritmul canotorului. [pron. strouc, scris şi stroc, pl. kuri. / < engl. stroke]. Trimis de LauraGellner, 13.09.2007. Sursa: DN  STROKE STROC/ s. n. (canotaj) numărul de lovituri de vâslă pe …   Dicționar Român

  • stroke — [n1] accomplishment achievement, blow*, feat, flourish, hit*, move, movement; concept 706 Ant. failure, loss stroke [n2] seizure apoplexy, attack, collapse, convulsion, fit, shock; concepts 33,308 stroke [v] …   New thesaurus

  • Stroke — Stroke, obs. imp. of {Strike}. Struck. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • stroke — index calamity, expedient, maneuver (tactic), operation Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Stroke — For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). Stroke Classification and external resources CT scan slice of the brain showing a right hemispheric ischemic stroke (left side of image). ICD 10 …   Wikipedia

  • stroke — stroke1 S3 [strəuk US strouk] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(illness)¦ 2¦(swimming/rowing)¦ 3¦(sport)¦ 4¦(pen/brush)¦ 5 at a/one stroke 6 on the stroke of seven/nine etc 7 stroke of luck/fortune 8 stroke of genius/inspiration etc 9¦(hit) …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • stroke — stroke1 /strohk/, n., v., stroked, stroking. n. 1. the act or an instance of striking, as with the fist, a weapon, or a hammer; a blow. 2. a hitting of or upon anything. 3. a striking of a clapper or hammer, as on a bell. 4. the sound produced by …   Universalium

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