Storm
Storm Storm, n. [AS. storm; akin to D. storm, G. sturm, Icel. stormr; and perhaps to Gr. ? assault, onset, Skr. s? to flow, to hasten, or perhaps to L. sternere to strew, prostrate (cf. {Stratum}). [root]166.] 1. A violent disturbance of the atmosphere, attended by wind, rain, snow, hail, or thunder and lightning; hence, often, a heavy fall of rain, snow, or hail, whether accompanied with wind or not. [1913 Webster]

We hear this fearful tempest sing, Yet seek no shelter to avoid the storm. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. A violent agitation of human society; a civil, political, or domestic commotion; sedition, insurrection, or war; violent outbreak; clamor; tumult. [1913 Webster]

I will stir up in England some black storm. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Her sister Began to scold and raise up such a storm. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. A heavy shower or fall, any adverse outburst of tumultuous force; violence. [1913 Webster]

A brave man struggling in the storms of fate. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

4. (Mil.) A violent assault on a fortified place; a furious attempt of troops to enter and take a fortified place by scaling the walls, forcing the gates, or the like. [1913 Webster]

Note: Storm is often used in the formation of self-explained compounds; as, storm-presaging, stormproof, storm-tossed, and the like. [1913 Webster]

{Anticyclonic storm} (Meteor.), a storm characterized by a central area of high atmospheric pressure, and having a system of winds blowing spirally outward in a direction contrary to that cyclonic storms. It is attended by low temperature, dry air, infrequent precipitation, and often by clear sky. Called also {high-area storm}, {anticyclone}. When attended by high winds, snow, and freezing temperatures such storms have various local names, as {blizzard}, {wet norther}, {purga}, {buran}, etc.

{Cyclonic storm}. (Meteor.) A cyclone, or low-area storm. See {Cyclone}, above.

{Magnetic storm}. See under {Magnetic}.

{Storm-and-stress period} [a translation of G. sturm und drang periode], a designation given to the literary agitation and revolutionary development in Germany under the lead of Goethe and Schiller in the latter part of the 18th century.

{Storm center} (Meteorol.), the center of the area covered by a storm, especially by a storm of large extent.

{Storm door} (Arch.), an extra outside door to prevent the entrance of wind, cold, rain, etc.; -- usually removed in summer.

{Storm path} (Meteorol.), the course over which a storm, or storm center, travels.

{Storm petrel}. (Zo["o]l.) See {Stormy petrel}, under {Petrel}.

{Storm sail} (Naut.), any one of a number of strong, heavy sails that are bent and set in stormy weather.

{Storm scud}. See the Note under {Cloud}. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Tempest; violence; agitation; calamity.

Usage: {Storm}, {Tempest}. Storm is violent agitation, a commotion of the elements by wind, etc., but not necessarily implying the fall of anything from the clouds. Hence, to call a mere fall or rain without wind a storm is a departure from the true sense of the word. A tempest is a sudden and violent storm, such as those common on the coast of Italy, where the term originated, and is usually attended by a heavy rain, with lightning and thunder. [1913 Webster]

Storms beat, and rolls the main; O! beat those storms, and roll the seas, in vain. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

What at first was called a gust, the same Hath now a storm's, anon a tempest's name. --Donne. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:
, , , , , , (usually accompanied with rain, hail, or snow), (with or without rain, hail, or snow) / , , , , , , , , , , , , / , , , / , , , , / , , (with violence, as a fortification),


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Storm — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Andreas Storm (* 1964), deutscher Politiker (CDU) Edvard Storm (1749–1794), norwegischer Lyriker Emy Storm (* 1925), schwedische Schauspielerin Frederik Storm (* 1989), dänischer Eishockeyspieler Friedrich …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • storm — (n.) O.E. storm, from P.Gmc. *sturmaz (Cf. O.N. stormr, O.S., M.L.G., M.Du., Du. storm, O.H.G., Ger. sturm). O.Fr. estour onset, tumult, It. stormo are Gmc. loan words. Fig. (non meteorological) sense was in late O.E. The verb in the sense of to… …   Etymology dictionary

  • storm — ► NOUN 1) a violent disturbance of the atmosphere with strong winds and usually rain, thunder, lightning, or snow. 2) an uproar or controversy: the book caused a storm in America. 3) a violent or noisy outburst of a specified feeling or reaction …   English terms dictionary

  • storm — [stôrm] n. [ME < OE, akin to Ger sturm < IE base * (s)twer , to whirl, move or turn quickly > STIR1, L turbare, to agitate] 1. an atmospheric disturbance characterized by a strong wind, usually accompanied by rain, snow, sleet, or hail,… …   English World dictionary

  • storm — [n1] strong weather blast, blizzard, blow, cloudburst, cyclone, disturbance, downpour, gale, gust, hurricane, monsoon, precip*, precipitation, raining cats and dogs*, snowstorm, squall, tempest, tornado, twister, whirlwind, windstorm; concept 526 …   New thesaurus

  • Storm — Storm, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stormed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Storming}.] (Mil.) To assault; to attack, and attempt to take, by scaling walls, forcing gates, breaches, or the like; as, to storm a fortified town. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Storm — Storm, v. i. [Cf. AS. styrman.] 1. To raise a tempest. Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. To blow with violence; also, to rain, hail, snow, or the like, usually in a violent manner, or with high wind; used impersonally; as, it storms. [1913 Webster] 3.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Storm — m, f English: apparently a 20th century coinage, although it may have been in use slightly earlier. The name is presumably derived from the climatic phenomenon, although it is hard to see why it should be chosen. It derives perhaps from the… …   First names dictionary

  • storm — sb., en, e, ene; stormen pisker havet op; ride stormen af; tage publikum med storm …   Dansk ordbog

  • Storm — Storm, 1) Edward, geb. 1747 zu Vage in Guldbraudsdaalen; starb 1794 (nach And. 1792) in Kopenhagen; er schr.: Brager (ein Epos), Kopenhagen 1774; Fabeln, Balladen u. Erzählungen, ebd. 1782; Gesammelte Gedichte, ebd. 1785. 2) Theodor, geb. im… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

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