Sting moth
Sting Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting of a bee or wasp is a modified ovipositor. The caudal sting, or spine, of a sting ray is a modified dorsal fin ray. The term is sometimes applied to the fang of a serpent. See Illust. of {Scorpion}. [1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) A sharp-pointed hollow hair seated on a gland which secrets an acrid fluid, as in nettles. The points of these hairs usually break off in the wound, and the acrid fluid is pressed into it. [1913 Webster]

3. Anything that gives acute pain, bodily or mental; as, the stings of remorse; the stings of reproach. [1913 Webster]

The sting of death is sin. --1 Cor. xv. 56. [1913 Webster]

4. The thrust of a sting into the flesh; the act of stinging; a wound inflicted by stinging. ``The lurking serpent's mortal sting.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. A goad; incitement. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. The point of an epigram or other sarcastic saying. [1913 Webster]

{Sting moth} (Zo["o]l.), an Australian moth ({Doratifera vulnerans}) whose larva is armed, at each end of the body, with four tubercles bearing powerful stinging organs.

{Sting ray}. (Zo["o]l.) See under 6th {Ray}.

{Sting winkle} (Zo["o]l.), a spinose marine univalve shell of the genus Murex, as the European species ({Murex erinaceus}). See Illust. of {Murex}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • sting moth — /ˈstɪŋ mɒθ/ (say sting moth) noun a mottled cup moth, Doratifera vulnerans, the larvae of which can be found on eucalypts, guava and apricot trees …   Australian English dictionary

  • sting moth — noun : an Australian moth (Doratifera vulnerans) whose larva is armed at each end of the body with four tubercles bearing powerful stinging hairs …   Useful english dictionary

  • Sting — Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sting ray — Sting Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sting winkle — Sting Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sting bladder — noun : the larva of the sting moth …   Useful english dictionary

  • de Havilland Hornet Moth — For the twin engined 1940s fighter, see de Havilland Hornet. DH.87 Hornet Moth 1936 de Havil …   Wikipedia

  • Io moth — I o moth (?; 115). (Zo[ o]l.) A large and handsome American moth ({Hyperchiria Io}), having a large, bright colored spot on each hind wing, resembling the spots on the tail of a peacock. The larva is covered with prickly hairs, which sting like… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Io moth — /ˈaɪoʊ mɒθ/ (say uyoh moth) noun a showy and beautiful moth of North America, Automeris io, of yellow colouration, with prominent pink and bluish eyespots on the hind wings. {from Io1, who was tormented by a gadfly; in allusion to the sting of… …   Australian English dictionary

  • Mason moth — Mason Ma son, n. [F. ma[,c]on, LL. macio, machio, mattio, mactio, marcio, macerio; of uncertain origin.] [1913 Webster] 1. One whose occupation is to build with stone or brick; also, one who prepares stone for building purposes. [1913 Webster] 2 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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