Statute of frauds
Fraud Fraud (fr[add]d), n. [F. fraude, L. fraus, fraudis; prob. akin to Skr. dh[=u]rv to injure, dhv[.r] to cause to fall, and E. dull.] 1. Deception deliberately practiced with a view to gaining an unlawful or unfair advantage; artifice by which the right or interest of another is injured; injurious stratagem; deceit; trick. [1913 Webster]

If success a lover's toil attends, Few ask, if fraud or force attained his ends. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. (Law) An intentional perversion of truth for the purpose of obtaining some valuable thing or promise from another. [1913 Webster]

3. A trap or snare. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

To draw the proud King Ahab into fraud. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{Constructive fraud} (Law), an act, statement, or omission which operates as a fraud, although perhaps not intended to be such. --Mozley & W.

{Pious fraud} (Ch. Hist.), a fraud contrived and executed to benefit the church or accomplish some good end, upon the theory that the end justified the means.

{Statute of frauds} (Law), an English statute (1676), the principle of which is incorporated in the legislation of all the States of this country, by which writing with specific solemnities (varying in the several statutes) is required to give efficacy to certain dispositions of property. --Wharton.

Syn: Deception; deceit; guile; craft; wile; sham; strife; circumvention; stratagem; trick; imposition; cheat. See {Deception}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • statute of frauds — 1 often cap S&F a: a state law modeled on the English Statute of Frauds or dealing with the enforcement and requirements of agreements in particular circumstances see also statute of frauds in the important laws section compare main purpose rule; …   Law dictionary

  • Statute of frauds — The statute of frauds refers to the requirement that certain kinds of contracts be made in writing and signed.Traditionally, the statute of frauds requires a writing signed by the defendant in the following circumstances: * Contracts in… …   Wikipedia

  • Statute of Frauds — A legal concept that requires certain types of contracts to be executed in writing. The precise form of the Statute of Frauds varies between jurisdictions, but generally requires a writing for the following types of contracts: (1) Contracts for… …   Investment dictionary

  • statute of frauds — This is the common designation of a very celebrated English statute (29 Car. II, c. 3), passed in 1677, which has been adopted, in a more or less modified form, in nearly all of the United States. Its chief characteristic is the provision that no …   Black's law dictionary

  • statute of frauds — This is the common designation of a very celebrated English statute (29 Car. II, c. 3), passed in 1677, which has been adopted, in a more or less modified form, in nearly all of the United States. Its chief characteristic is the provision that no …   Black's law dictionary

  • statute of frauds — A statute which requires certain classes of contracts to be in writing. Sometimes called a statute for the prevention of frauds and perjuries. 49 Am J1st Stat of F § 1. A term sometimes applied in England to statutes affording relief against… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • statute of frauds — noun A statute that bars enforcement of an oral contract …   Wiktionary

  • statute of frauds — a statute designed to prevent fraudulent practices by requiring that various contracts and causes of action be evidenced by a writing signed by the party to be charged and varying in application to specific contracts according to British and… …   Useful english dictionary

  • frauds, statute of — This is the common designation of a very celebrated English statute (29 Car. II, c. 3), passed in 1677, which has been adopted, in a more or less modified form, in nearly all of the United States. Its chief characteristic is the provision that no …   Black's law dictionary

  • frauds, statute of — This is the common designation of a very celebrated English statute (29 Car. II, c. 3), passed in 1677, which has been adopted, in a more or less modified form, in nearly all of the United States. Its chief characteristic is the provision that no …   Black's law dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”