Stanchest
Stanch Stanch, a. [Compar. {Stancher} (-[~e]r); superl. {Stanchest}.] [From {Stanch}, v. t., and hence literally signifying, stopped or stayed; cf. Sp. estanco stopped, tight, not leaky, as a ship. See {Stanch}, v. t.] [Written also {staunch}.] 1. Strong and tight; sound; firm; as, a stanch ship. [1913 Webster]

One of the closets is parqueted with plain deal, set in diamond, exceeding stanch and pretty. --Evelyn. [1913 Webster]

2. Firm in principle; constant and zealous; loyal; hearty; steady; steadfast; as, a stanch churchman; a stanch friend or adherent. --V. Knox. [1913 Webster]

In politics I hear you 're stanch. --Prior. [1913 Webster]

3. Close; secret; private. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

This is to be kept stanch. --Locke. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Stanch — Stanch, a. [Compar. {Stancher} ( [ e]r); superl. {Stanchest}.] [From {Stanch}, v. t., and hence literally signifying, stopped or stayed; cf. Sp. estanco stopped, tight, not leaky, as a ship. See {Stanch}, v. t.] [Written also {staunch}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stancher — Stanch Stanch, a. [Compar. {Stancher} ( [ e]r); superl. {Stanchest}.] [From {Stanch}, v. t., and hence literally signifying, stopped or stayed; cf. Sp. estanco stopped, tight, not leaky, as a ship. See {Stanch}, v. t.] [Written also {staunch}.] 1 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • staunch — Stanch Stanch, a. [Compar. {Stancher} ( [ e]r); superl. {Stanchest}.] [From {Stanch}, v. t., and hence literally signifying, stopped or stayed; cf. Sp. estanco stopped, tight, not leaky, as a ship. See {Stanch}, v. t.] [Written also {staunch}.] 1 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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